Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Street View now covers more Scottish coastline (but where?)

Rocky coast

I don’t know where the email alert I should have received from Google about its most recent updates to Maps and Street View has been since March 7 (the date on the message) but it only arrived last night.

As I have lamented before, while Google used to have someone prepare an overlay that showed where on Google Earth the latest imagery updates were applied, this stopped a while ago, and has not returned, so I can’t point at specifics, which I like to do, both for my own information, and to make it easier for those who were interested to find their area if it was included.

So, all I can say is that the latest alert regarding updated Street View imagery (and this alert was about Street View, as opposed to the more general Aerial or Satellite View), is that it applied to some areas of Scottish coastline… and some UK cities, specifically:

In the UK we’re refreshing some imagery in major cities like London, Manchester, Glasgow and Cardiff, as well as filling in some of the gaps where we had no Street View coverage. For example, we’ve added brand new images to parts of the Scottish coastline, in pockets of East Anglia and parts of South Wales.

There’s also the mention in there of Glasgow having update imagery in Street View, and I think I actually saw this before reading the email.

For those who know the city, if you use Street View to head up York Street from the river, and cross Argyle Street, then you will see the wall on your right magically transformed from an abandoned piece of waste into a series of large artistic murals as caught in 2012. To see the old wall, just cross over to West Campbell Street, and look back to see 2008:

Google views abandoned Fukushima

I just happen to be looking at this exploration – Urban Exploration? – at the moment, so pass on the link since I am mentioning Street View.

Google Maps, working with Namie-machi mayor Tamotsu Baba, drove Google Street View cars through the abandoned town this month. In a blog post, Baba explained why: “Many of the displaced townspeople have asked to see the current state of their city, and there are surely many people around the world who want a better sense of how the nuclear incident affected surrounding communities.”

Click here to go to the scene

The are still boats lying inland, and the citizens are not allowed to return to their homes.

It’s hard to comment from a distance (and this is on the opposite side of the World) but I think I am reasonably safe in saying they could go home today were it not for the fear spread by radiophobia. As far as I know, there was no fallout from Fukushima, only the release of radioactive gasses at the time of the earthquake and tsunami that did the damage. More people were actually harmed and died from that than anything that happened at the nuclear power stations, but it is still the nuclear power station that are being pointed at as the villains of the story.

There were no casualties caused by radiation exposure, approximately 25,000 died due to the earthquake and tsunami, and more than 200,000 were evacuated.

By March 2013, reports indicated barely detectable effects on the population’s lifetime from the disaster at the power station.

Lest I get misquoted, I am not saying there are no effects to be found, and it should not be forgotten that the sea will be suffering contamination as heavy elements are washed out from the damaged plant, but this does not go to the town, it goes to the sea, to the fish for example, so these are probably not the best diet for locals. Actually they’re very good for anyone, as they seem to have well over 200 time the safe limit of radiation.

You might want to read this before thinking I am mad suggesting that the Fukushima residents might just be allowed back into their homes:

The Psychology of Cancer Clusters : Fire in the Mind

Advertisements

March 29, 2013 - Posted by | Maps | , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: