Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Barnton Quarry bunker to be developed as partner to Scotland’s Secret Bunker at Anstruther

It’s been a little while since I spotted the last news about developments at Barnton Quarry, and I held off mentioning the story in case there might be more given away in the media, but after a couple of items, there doesn’t seem to have been anything to add.

The bunker at Barnton was acquired by the owner of Scotland’s Secret Bunker way back in 2005, but due to the condition of the interior, and the money needed to clean it out and restore it, little happened until 2009, when a survey was carried out.

This was a sad story, as the bunker had been broken into on a number of occasions, used and abused by ravers, and then be devastated by fires, first in August 1991, and then again in May 1993. It’s pathetic to think that those who did the damage were so easily amused, and had nothing better to do to fulfil their sad lives than spray ‘tags’ on any available surface. Same behaviour as dogs peeing on lampposts and walls to mark their territory.

The most dangerous aspect of this had been the amount of asbestos liberated into the air, meaning that access became so hazardous even the vandal had decided to give the place a wide berth.

Fast forward to the start of 2013, and in February The Scotsman carried a lengthy article on the bunker at Barnton: Queen’s Edinburgh nuclear bunker to open as museum – Latest news – Scotsman.com, describing its past, and revealing the plans to open the site as a museum, similar to Scotland’s Secret Bunker at Troywood near Anstruther on the Fife coast.

Missing from this account was any indication of when the new attraction might open its doors.

This arrived in April, when STV carried a much shorter story about the bunker: Edinburgh underground bunker to be opened up to visitors | News | Edinburgh | STV, but added the important detail of a 3-year plan for completion of the new project, meaning that we could see this attraction open in 2016.

Probably the most intriguing point about this is the point made by the chap behind the project, as it is one of the closest facilities of the type to any sort of population centre, making it a little easier to get to, and enjoy a visit.

Assuming they manage to get it looking as good as Troywood, and they will have to collect a load of equipment to get it refurbished and looking remotely original, then it will be a great day out.

A visit to the bunker at Anstruther can easily eat up a day, especially if the whole bunker is explored in detail, and all the films on offer in the small theatre are viewed.

You can read, and see, more of the bunker (and others) in Nick Catford’s book Subterranean Britain: Cold War Bunkers which was also featured by The Scotsman a couple of years ago: Barnton bunker a hot spot in the Cold War – News – Scotsman.com

Advertisements

May 11, 2013 - Posted by | Cold War | , , , , , ,

1 Comment »

  1. Reblogged this on kjmhoffman.

    Like

    Comment by jkmhoffman | May 11, 2013


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: