Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

New book tells the story of a World War II gunner

Those interested in World War II gun sites and batteries may be interested to know of a new publication we are aware of (having had an enquiry from the author some time back).

Far be it for me to try and better the description on the publisher’s site:

Armageddon Fed Up With This
A Gunner’s Tale
by Derek Nudd

In 1940 Eric Nudd, like millions of others, found himself unexpectedly in uniform – a raw conscript in a heavy anti-aircraft regiment. He grew over the next five years into a seasoned professional with the Normandy and North West European campaigns under his belt.

A previously unsuspected talent for maths took him from heaving shells to fire-control and then radar, giving him a ringside view of the manic wartime technology race. As a Fleet Street journalist, prolific letter-writer and occasional poet Eric published improvised news sheets from a succession of gun sites and dugouts.

Armageddon Fed Up With This – A Gunner’s Tale is told by a ‘civilian-in-uniform’ who was an acute observer and literate recorder of what he saw. His wry, sometimes scathing observations on the humour and idiocy of army life, and the military, political and cultural events of the time are set against the global cataclysm going on around him. The author, Derek Nudd, colours in the background for those of us lucky enough to have missed it.

Inspired by authors such as Cyril Demarne and Spike Milligan, Armageddon Fed Up With This provides a new perspective – from underneath – on the anti-aircraft forces who, for a while after the fall of France, were the only part of the army shooting back. This book will appeal to readers who enjoy historical and military biographies, and provide new insights for students of the period. The title was a contemporary joke.

Armageddon Fed Up With This – A Gunner’s Tale – Matador Non-Fiction – Derek Nudd

The book is now with the printer, and the publisher’s web site is taking advance orders with the offer of a 20% discount.

The book includes a first-hand account of gunsite life at Gourock, Airdrie and Kilcreggan over the winter of 1941-42.

Transcripts of the regiment’s war diary for that period can be freely downloaded from the author’s web site:

Derek Nudd – Author – Home

Armageddon Fed Up With This

Armageddon Fed Up With This
A Gunner’s Tale
by Derek Nudd

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January 1, 2015 - Posted by | World War II | , ,

2 Comments »

  1. Glad to get this book promo because it’s been months since I received a Secret Scotland and feared that my email address was lost in the ozone. I do not recall seeing any gunsights as a boy in Scotland. I saw them in England and Wales as well as a lot of barrage balloons,(our family moved about a lot with my dad’s job in the RAF) but my only memory of war related construction in Scotland was a row of large concrete blocks on the beach in Carnoustie (anti-tank? anti landing craft?). I hope to read this book since Airdrie is mentioned.It has special meaning for me.

    Be well.

    Ralph H.

    Like

    Comment by gailsnotes | January 18, 2015

  2. Thanks for the comment Ralph.

    The email system is, of course, fully automatic, but various circumstances beginning in February of last year managed to dampen my enthusiasm, and by July I’d lost the will to do much.

    I had planned a restart on Jan 1 of this year, but landed more problems instead. I’ll keep trying.

    As regards Airdrie, I did visit the grid refs of some former military sites there more than a decade ago (location obtained from archived records) but found that they had all been developed or razed in some way, one even being absorbed by a quarry, so there was unfortunately nothing to see or report on.

    The sort of anti-invasion beach defence you describe is one of the features more likely to have survived, with quite a few listed in our main site. They’re more likely to be lost to erosion than demolition.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Apollo | January 18, 2015


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