Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Kelvingrove – the wide view

I’ve been meaning to get this shot together for ages, but just never found the time.

It’s not that it could take a lot of time to create, but more that I hadn’t tried one as big or wide as this before, as it was intended to capture almost 180° horizontally and vertically. While it would have been nice to also have a flattened view, I can only afford free software, so can only combine pics taken from a point. I did try to trick the software once, by taking flat shots across a subject, but it just laughed at me, and could not work out how to find and match the edges of the images to be stitched together.

This eventually came out reasonably well, being a combination of almost 50 images, each being more than 10 MB.

I’m not sure how the top came to be so far off centre – I thought I was standing on the centreline (guess not).

There’s ghosting of people since the place was busy, and although this reduced size version of the full stitch doesn’t show it, I really had too much overlap between each image. With fewer images, I usually can’t see the join or any overlap effects. With lots of overlap, the software probably can’t combine the areas without leaving at least some evidence.

It’s funny, as I’ve done the same with views of the Winter Gardens at the People’s Palace, where a fairly ordinary wide-angle lens can catch enough of the view from the balcony to make the effort of stitching multiple images more or less pointless.

But pointing the same lens at this view inside Kelvingrove?

Almost not worth the effort… unless you stand back and frame the view through pillars. But then you’re not going to get the full side-to-side and floor to ceiling view, like this:

Kelvingrove Pano Stitch

Kelvingrove Pano Stitch

Looking at this final effort, I noticed that it demonstrates one of the seldom mentioned advantages of digital over film.

This image shows an exposure range I (as a poor amateur) would never have been able to capture or show using film, as it shows detail in the shadowy dark end of the view, where the organ can be seen, while still showing bright detail in the illuminated lights, and the individual glazing frames within the upper windows, which had the bright sky behind.

And this is without any deliberate post-processing to enhance selected detail.

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September 1, 2017 - Posted by | Civilian, photography | , ,

4 Comments »

  1. And meanwhile, today the DM beats Admin. to the draw with ‘for sale’ article on the Gothic style villa Balgray Tower , also known as Breeze’s Tower or Duncan’s Tower – Springburn must be on his beat ??

    Like

    Comment by Tony | September 1, 2017

  2. Nice, but way off my possible beat. I know as I once wondered if the nearby derelict Winter Gardens might make a walk one day.

    Like

    Comment by Apollo | September 1, 2017

  3. 2nd April, 2017- I posted a Kelvingrove poem on my site. It might interest ypu…

    Like

    Comment by Candia | September 3, 2017

  4. Thanks.

    Hope others take the time to get as far down as the comments and see this link:

    Kelvingrove Diorama

    Like

    Comment by Apollo | September 3, 2017


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