Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Cambuslang Lodge pic in a narrow street

That went surprisingly well.

I’ve looked at a lodge building in a Cambuslang side street – Tabernacle Lane – and wondered how to take a pic.

It’s a narrow street. Two cars could pass without a fight, although there’s only room for one since the street usually has them parked along one side, leaving the other side as a single lane for access either way. As a pure guess, that mean only about 5 metres from the façade of the building until your back hits the opposite wall.

A 24 mm lens captures some, but this is most it can see, in a single shot.

Cambuslang Lodge Wide

Cambuslang Lodge Wide

Time for some magic, and a test to see how good it might be.

By taking a number of pics across the façade, these can be stitched together to form a view of the whole.

I got quite close, but I’m still finding it difficult to guess how much extra I need to include around the edges, to avoid missing any coverage, and the resultant black areas. In this case, I was just a little short of material in the bottom left and right corners.

Cambuslang Lodge Stitched

Cambuslang Lodge Stitched

On the other hand, I DID get the whole façade, the missing parts are outside the desired area.

And it’s considerably better than was achieved with a single wide-angle shot.

Unlike most panoramas, which usually only combine images horizontally, I can also do this vertically, and for any number of images, but found the less I use, the better. The single wide shown first is actually one of the shots merged into the stitched view.

Just my luck as usual – as I was leaving, a woman arrived and removed the car blocking the view of centre bottom of the building.

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01/06/2018 Posted by | Civilian, photography | , , | Leave a comment

Today is Fish and Chip Day

01 June 2018 is Fish and Chip Day

I’m afraid this is another of those ‘wandering’ days, as it falls on the first Friday of June.

Oh! See also Doughnut Day, which also falls on this day.

(Today is a VERY good day.)

This one seems to be firmly rooted in Britain for its origin, although it has spread around the world since it became popular.

It seems that its popularity can be traced back to the workers, the late 1800s, the growth in trawl fishing of the North Sea, the resultant availability of plentiful food (in other words cheaper to get), and the hungry workers, and later holidaymakers when holidays were legislated for, meant that fish and chips was almost born to be successful.

At least this is an easy day to celebrate, either as a DIY job, or by heading for the nearest fish and chip shop – at least you won’t have far to go.

Or use it as an excuse for a day at the seaside!

Fish And Chips And Seaside

Fish And Chips And Seaside

01/06/2018 Posted by | Civilian | | Leave a comment

Today is Doughnut Day

01 June 2018 is Doughnut Day.

I’m afraid this is another of those ‘wandering’ days, as it falls on the first Friday of June.

Oh! See also Fish and Chip Day, which also falls on this day.

(Today is a VERY good day.)

The history of the doughnut isn’t definite, but it is known is that the holy (small ‘h’) appeared in the US during the mid-1800’s.

The story is that a chap named Hanson Gregory invented them as he hated the undercooked centre and greasiness of existing shapes and options, so he used a tin pepper box to punch out the centres, this allowing the remainder to cook evenly.

Sounds good to me.

I guess I’m pretty traditional, and my favourite doughnut is the plain type, sprinkled or coated with sugar – properly cooked through of course.

Just because it is CALLED a DOUGHnut does not mean it has to be served semi-raw, with half its insides uncooked.

It seems Doughnut Day is due, in part at least, to the efforts of a doctor (Morgan Pett) serving in the military during the first World War, and who wanted to brighten the day of the wounded soldiers he was treating (with a treat).

On his first day at work in a military base, he bought 8 dozen doughnuts and gave one to each soldier he worked on. After giving one to Lieutenant General Samuel Geary (who accepted it in good humour and appreciation for the doctors work, he decided to start a fundraiser, allowing the young doctor to continue to provide doughnuts to his patients.

He also began to work with the Salvation Army which, after a fact-finding mission, determined that the many needs of soldiers could be met by creating social centres to provide various amenities, including… doughnuts. The Salvation Army sent 250 volunteers to France to help put huts together for this purpose, and these soon became a mainstay of military life. On one record day, they recorded some 300 doughnuts and 700 cups of coffee being served. Due to the majority of the Salvation Army workers being female, they came to be known as “Doughnut Dollies.”

Doughnuts

Doughnuts

Those machines

I can’t let this one pass without a mention for the automatic doughnut making machine.

I’m not sure when these first appeared, but I was tiny.

They were a thing of joy to watch when on holiday, or having a day at the seaside.

The baker’s shop (and later snack shops and cafés on the front) put them in their shop windows (or beside the serving hatch if they were really small snack shops), and it was amazing to see the people crowd around the windows to watch the machines steadily churning out perfect doughnuts, and they were… perfect.

They cooked one side, then flipped them over mid-trip the delivery chute, and gave them time to drain properly too, so no greasy slops or soggy dough.

If you saw one of these machines running, you saw what you were getting.

Dipped in sugar, stuffed in a bag, and still warm when you bought them.

Update

If you REALLY like your doughnuts, you can get a bigger version of this machine.

Ladies and Gentlemen…

The Belshaw Mark 6 Robot Doughnut Machine.

01/06/2018 Posted by | military, World War I | , | 2 Comments

   

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