Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Hope there isn’t a fire at the Coats Observatory refurb

Being from Glasgow, known by some as Tinderbox City, and mindful of the Mackintosh Building’s fate (not to mention a number of other Sauchiehall Street buildings in recent times), I couldn’t really ignore this photo opportunity that developed in Paisley, as I was taking pics of the old Coats Observatory building, currently being refurbished.

The van driver just pulled up, locked the van, and disappeared into the flats on the left.

Oakshaw Street Fire Path

Oakshaw Street West Fire Path

I’m not going to pass any comment, just zoom into the sign on the left.

Oakshaw Street West Sign

Oakshaw Street West Sign

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23/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography, Transport | , , , , | Leave a comment

Volunteers… DON’T go into the light!

While I admire those who are able to volunteer their time and effort to support legitimate charities (always check any organisation sailing under the charity banner – and find out if it’s supporting a multimillionaire head first, and beneficiaries second).

I can’t offer the same ‘charitable’ opinion of huge commercial ventures that depend on volunteers to make it work.

Yes, I’m looking at you, usually giant sports ventures that eat millions, pay little or nothing to those who make them successful, and strut their stuff with claims of how much they benefit the local economy – while selectively forgetting about any monies that goes to those behind them.

I suspect a few lucky folk walk off with a nice little pot – while thousands of volunteer get expenses and beer money to keep them happy, and probably lots and lots of mind-bending indoctrinational inspirational talks about how ‘important’ they are to the success of the venture.

I’m impressed, really, I am, at how these events manage to pull the same trick every time they come around, be they the Olympics, the Commonwealth Games or whatever.

There’s currently a whopping THREE such events competing for free labour volunteers to help them along to a healthy bottom line once the books are closed and the accountants go home.

A recruitment drive has been launched for volunteers to join the team running three major sporting events in Glasgow.

Glasgow Life are looking for people to help with the running of the LEN European Short Course Swimming Championships, the LGT World Men’s Curling Championship and UEFA EURO 2020.

Applicants will be able to choose which event, and how many, they’d like to be involved in.

A variety of roles, including supporting spectators and visitors,

Applications open on Monday July 22 and will close on Sunday August 25, for a variety of roles including supporting spectators and visitors to the city during the events.

Thousands of people have volunteered at previous events in the city including the 2014 Commonwealth Games and 2018 European Championships.

Across all three events, more than 1,000 volunteers will participate in some of the biggest events in the world.

Glasgow volunteers sought for three major sporting events

It’s funny how unions and suchlike get all up in arms and mouthy about ‘Free labour’, ‘Cheap about’, or even ‘Slave labour’ when business try to run apprenticeships, or work experience schemes, but I can’t think of a union that has lifted a finger over highly profitable sporting events and similar – which would probably be financial ‘Black Holes’ if they were forced to pay EVERYBODY involved in their running.

Maybe the union bosses like football etc, and have corporate boxes at those events, for their rich mates.

Volunteer Zombies

PS – Don’t forget

Don’t forget the other little scheme that let goodies be divvied up between the lucky few.

The ‘Awards’.

I’m not going to waste time on this, but it would be nice to know how much Glasgow will have to throw into a ‘Money Pit’ (regardless of whether it wins this award) just to keep in the running for this.

Glasgow officially noted its intention to bid in January of this year, and submitted a formal candidature bid last month, resulting in the city being shortlisted for the title alongside Genoa, Italy.

If successful, Glasgow would be the first city to win the coveted title twice. It would also mark 20 years since it first gained the accolade back in 2003.

Glasgow shortlisted for European Capital of Sport award

Mentioning ‘sport’ seems to make some people lose touch with reality, and expenses.

22/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, Lost | , , , | Leave a comment

So, THAT’s Coats Observatory (the outside, at least)

I don’t really know why (apart from the obvious distance), but I’ve seldom made the trip to Paisley, despite the presence of interesting places to see/visit there.

Decades ago I did end up there a few times, once to look for a camera shop (now gone of course), and a few more time to visit Dunn’s Models, also gone after making the move to Glasgow city centre.

I never got around to even finding, let alone visiting any of the features, such as Coats Observatory.

I’ve almost rectified that, having found the place recently, purely by chance, while visiting Paisley (to buy some computer goodies).

However, with my usual spectacular timing and the intervention of ‘Spooky Coincidence’, the place looked closed, abandoned, and almost derelict – not what I’d expected.

Seems my timing was such that I’d arrived at the wrong time…

Coats Observatory along with Paisley Museum and Paisley Central Library is currently closed to the public while the buildings undergo a 4 year long £42m transformation. During that period there will be no public tours or visits. We will re-open in late 2022 following the redevelopment.

So, I have to wait for a further three years before there’s any chance of looking inside or visiting.

Oh well, at least I know where to go now.

It’s easy to see how/why it became an attraction (as opposed to an observatory), given the proximity of houses with chimneys filling the surrounding air with smoke, and how the expanding town would have filled the sky with light.

It’s a while since anyone cleaned and polished the plaque, or even blew the cobwebs off.

Coats Observatory Plaque

Coats Observatory Plaque

These views show the problems the observatory came to suffer, despite being on a hilltop, with houses and chimneys around it.

Coats Observatory

Coats Observatory

The entrance is reasonably impressive, with an appropriately themed carving in the tympanum.

Coats Observatory Tympanum

Coats Observatory Tympanum

it got me thinking…

The telescope is obvious, as is the wise owl standing on books.

But a chicken?

A little research, and it seems I should be referring to the chicken as a cock (sorry, I was actually trying to avoid that).

And that, it seems, stands for ‘Courage and perseverance; hero; able in politics’

While Thomas Coats (1809–1883) was a Scottish thread manufacturer who, with his brother made the Ferguslie Thread Works substantial, I suspect that latter did not tarnish the family name 😉

So – now all I have to do is keep breathing until late 2022, as Coats Observatory becomes yet ANOTHER museum class venue that I’ve lost access to for around four years.

And I thought I was done with this waiting crap as I shuffled around waiting for the Burrell Collection to reopen its doors in 2020.

I don’t really want to sound morbid, but I’ve recently begun to wonder just how many people drop dead waiting to make that ‘One Last Visit’ during these extended closures?

22/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography | , , | Leave a comment

Interesting – Was the Vacant and Derelict Land Taskforce based on my thoughts?

Just for fun, I thought I’d ask that question in the post title after seeing a news article about the Vacant and Derelict Land Taskforce.

In this recent post: Derelict Meadowpark Street up for development I suggested:

This is the sort of site that developers should be tackling, which had buildings in place, but for whatever reason have been razed, then left derelict.

I really don’t understand why (although I obviously don’t know the details of individual locations such as this, or the costs associated with them) developers seem to find the need to go after sites with existing buildings on them, which can attract local hostility with news of demolition in advance of new build.

If I was in the fortunate position of being able to commission builds, I’d run around and snatch all the gap sites such as this if they were available.

So, it was intriguing to see this:

Derelict land in urban areas could be used to create the next generation of allotments or city farms to increase local provision of fresh food, a report by a new taskforce has recommended.

Gap sites are described as a “persistent challenge” in Scotland but experts believe that bringing them back into use could help tackle social inequalities.

Derelict land in Scotland could be used for new generation of allotments

The article’s worth a little read, as it goes some way to explaining the puzzle I posed in my original post, as to why these sites are not picked up.

It seems it’s really just down to their having become ‘invisible’.

Having lain unused for so long, developers just can’t ‘see’ them, and go looking for something new, in the (probably mistaken) belief that a new site will be better than an old site.

It seems to me that is an ideal opportunity for one of those sessions I recommend when it becomes obvious those involved in making decision have lost all contact with Common Sense, and they need someone to take hold of them and bang their head together (literary, or figuratively, whichever works) to wake them up, and get their brains started.

Somebody really should – it might stop things like this being created.

A lovely flat piece of ground that has been like that since the locals were made ‘most annoyed’ as their Community Hub was razed to make way for the 2014 Commonwealth Games. It hasn’t been used for anything, and their hub was forcibly installed in an annexe to the Emirates Arena.

After all that, it was almost closed down as Flagship 2014 Commonwealth Games ‘Legacy’ sinks

Dalmarnock Community Hub Site

Former Dalmarnock Community Hub Site

We’ll see if the Vacant and Derelict Land Taskforce comes up with anything in the months and years to come, or if it just fades away.

While I detect a will for change, I also see many projects which suggest, to me at least, that those behind them are still too keen to see something ‘New’, rather than something ‘Reused’.

They’re far too keen to be ‘First’ on a virgin site, and it’s almost as if they see not being first as some sort of ‘Second Class’ or downmarket stigma.

21/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , | Leave a comment

So, this old bank building WAS saved after all

Remember the old building I mention in Remember this Argyle Street building?

Seems it finally managed to go from an irreparable ruin that couldn’t be saved to Glasgow latest conversion to flats.

While the good old naysayers generally make their usual chant of ‘No No No’ regardless, I suspect only the most stubborn wouldn’t break the habit for this.

PLANNERS have agreed that a B-listed Glasgow City Centre building — once assessed by structural engineers as “incapable of repair” — can be converted into flats.

Four years ago plans were lodged to knock down the former commercial premises on Argyle Street at Miller Street and build student accommodation; it was only after the building was used as a giant advertising space that it was realised it could be saved.

A document submitted to Glasgow City Council by ZM Architecture explaining the new development stated: “In 2015, the previous owners proposed to demolish the building and the justification for this was based on detailed findings and a structural /economic assessment of the repair works needed to deal with a corroded structural frame.

“The scaffold that has been erected around the building for advertising…has allowed our conservation team with engineers David Narro Associates, to make a detailed independent assessment of the issues highlighted and the conclusion we are reaching is more favourable and that the building can be saved.

“Scaffold access has allowed tests to be carried out, a full stone fabric condition survey and structural frame opening up. This work is ongoing and a detailed stone enabling contract is to be organised so that full refurbishment of the façade can be undertaken with known risks and methods for stone replacement and treatment for frame conversion.”

FLATS Conversion Approved For Historic Glasgow Building That Was Under Threat Of Demolition

Retail space will continue in the ground floor and basement, while three flats will be created on each of the remaining levels.

Also…

If you ever follow my advice and “Look Up!” while walking around the city centre, you might have noticed a trend where many existing buildings have gained an extra floor, added to their roofs.

This is often grey, set back from the edge, and sometimes has sloping sides, all factors apparently intended to make the addition relatively invisible from the ground (unless you’re looking for it).

This conversion is no exception to this apparent ‘rule’, and explains why this is a common feature…

Remodelling of the roof profile is proposed under the new scheme. This involves a raised single storey element being added at the eighth floor for equipment space, and an extended upper level to create a ‘penthouse residential unit’. The front section of roof would become a private terrace “framed by a new formal elevation giving the building a new terminating storey.”

So, now we know – we’re not imagining it.

They’ll even be fixing the back of the place, which is currently visibly deteriorating.

A new element in a contemporary style would replace the existing brick rear section which is in poor structural condition.

The old place…

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

Now that the plans have been given the go-ahead, we’ll be spared the sight of disgusting sights like this…

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

Find some BETTER views than that thing in this old post about the building…

50 Argyle Street – Derelict Bank of Scotland plus more murals

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

21/08/2019 Posted by | council, photography | , , , | Leave a comment

Looks like plans for the old meat market are set to go ahead

It’s not that long (only six months) since I noted that Glasgow Council has to spend £6 million BEFORE the old meat market site is developed

However, it seems that if that was true, it’s finally paved the way for the derelict area to be returned to some sort of useful service.

A historic 19th century landmark in the east end of Glasgow is to be transformed into residential accommodation.

The original Glasgow Meat Market will be transformed into hundreds of affordable accommodation, as well a commercial space.

Home Group in Scotland will be working in partnership with the City Council to deliver the 240 affordable homes as well as a hotel and commercial space by 2024.

Historic Glasgow Meat Market to be transformed into 240 homes and hotel

Five years to wait until completion – assuming all goes to plan, there are no strikes, no disputes, no planning disputes, and no “WE WANT MORE MONEY!” fun.

Although I pass the area regularly, I don’t expect there will me much to see. I’ve come to learn that one big building site looks much like another while work is underway.

If there’s anything worth seeing, it doesn’t generally appear until the job’s done.

I think we’ll just go with an old pic (which will disappear once this place is built).

Nice Sky

Nice Sky

20/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography | , , , | Leave a comment

Union Street bus gate sign

I got the chance to take a couple of quick pics related to the new bus gate I mentioned recently. Appropriately, both were taken from one of the buses which should benefit from the gate.

I grabbed the first as we were negotiating the cheeky dog-leg that sees the bus travel north against the normal one way traffic flow to the south in Jamaica Street, as it transits from Howard Street into Midland Street, on the left. Both Midland Street and Howard Street (at this location) are two-way, and the two flows have to alternate as these streets are narrow. In fact, the entry into Midland Street is so tight that if any dopey/impatient car driver stops on the cycle area ahead of the vehicular stop line, the bus usually can’t make the turn, and the offending driver has to find a way to back up out of the bus’s way. And that’s not always easy if a queue has stopped behind the eejit.

It’s also a good idea to remember the oncoming buses if you are cycling along Midland Street, and keep to the left if the lights are at red, otherwise you’re going to be face to face with around 8 tonnes of bus – and that’s just best avoided, even if it is moving at walking pace.

The second pic was sheer chance in Union Street, when I saw the warning sign about the impending arrival of the bus gate, and tried to catch it as the bus passed.

I only had one chance, and I’m surprised I even caught it, given the ‘wake-up’ time of the camera.

Union Street Bus Gate Sign

Union Street Bus Gate Sign

19/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography, Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Might Glasgow follow Edinburgh’s anti-tourist lead?

There were some intriguing media articles concerning the ever-increasing tourist numbers arriving in Edinburgh year-on-year, especially during the days of the Festival and the Fringe.

I can confirm the effect, although it’s many years since I was a regular visitor there, either on a random basis, or during festival time, and it could be busy enough and disruptive with the numbers I joined them. I can only imagine what it’s like there now, with significant growth in both the tourist/visitor numbers, and the matching growth in performers who have to be accommodated as well.

The locals are becoming hostile…

EDINBURGH residents left frazzled by the Fringe are snapping up passive-aggressive T-shirts aimed at getting tourists out of their way.

The bright yellow garments are emblazoned with the slogan: “Please, MOVE, I live here.”

In a bid to make sure on Edinburgh residents wear the £20 T-shirts, they are delivered free to anyone with an EH postcode. Outsiders have to pay a £30 delivery charge.

Edinburgh firm Print By Hand created the T-shirt to help locals navigate their city during August, when the world’s largest arts festival comes to town.

“Please, MOVE, I live here.” Edinburgh locals snap up anti-tourist T shirts

Apparently, Festival organisers are taking note, and adopting a ‘Not our fault’ stance…

Edinburgh is at risk of being seen as ‘anti-tourist’ in the wake of campaigners raising concerns about the impact of festivals and events on the city, the chief executive of the Fringe Society has warned.

Shona McCarthy hit back at critics of what is claimed to be a growing “festivalisation” and “exploitation” of the city centre for major events, describing some of the criticisms that had been raised as “a bit weird”.

She insisted the Fringe should not be held responsible for the management of tourism numbers in the city centre, but warned the city’s welcoming reputation was “seriously in danger” due to an ongoing debate about the impact of the industry.

Edinburgh is in danger of becoming an ‘anti-tourist’ city, Fringe chief warns

While I’m happy to let them work out their own blame allocation and solution strategy, I wonder if this might pre-empt a similar response in Glasgow?

I noticed disruption last year while passing through Glasgow Green, due to the numerous large scale events held there, although I tended to be there once they were over, so only saw the after effects,

However, this year I’ve found that the Green was completely closed at one point, and I was forced to cross over to the other side of the River in order to continue my journey.

And I’ve had my access to the city centre, and even bus journeys disrupted as the streets have been closed for significant periods to allow various events and sports to be carried out.

On the one hand, this doesn’t affect me much as I don’t live or work there – on the other, if I’m only there occasionally AND have my day disrupted, then as a percentage of my time there, that become a significant number.

So…

If the claims I’ve heard by some, that what happens in Edinburgh eventually happens in Glasgow, will an anti-tourist movement  rise in Glasgow?

It may be nice to bring all these things to the city, and that includes the growing numbers of film shoots (which lead to days of street closures and ogling celebrity watchers), but I suspect that, like Edinburghers, Glaswegians may have a tipping point, and the patience of some may run out.

Media sources such as GlasgowLive now carry regular list of street closures for these events

They affect people whether they’re interested in these things, or not.

Just a thought.

Please Move t-shirt

Please Move t-shirt

Update

So, it may not be tourism, but only days after the last closure(s), it is yet another event that’s closing the streets in the city centre, and inconveniencing those who are not interested – or just fed up being diverted.

Several roads will be closed across the city as Glasgow City Council host a free environmental event.

The Evolution Green fleet will be taking place at the City Chambers on Friday and Saturday – showcasing the Government’s strategy to improve air quality across the UK.

Road closures in Glasgow – Council ‘Clean Air Strategies’ environmental event to take place in city centre

How long until the next set of closures?

19/08/2019 Posted by | Appeal, Civilian, council, Transport | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Did I find some of George Square’s original Christmas Bells? (Yes I did)

Wandering along one of the routes I’ve not seen for some months, I was surprised to something I thought I was unlikely to see again (and wasn’t lying here until recently).

If I’m right, and these things are pretty rare and recognisable, it’s a pair of animated bells from the string which once hung around George Square as part of its past Christmas Lights.

Unlike the lights seen today, which can probably be assembled from various lighting modules found online, George Squares original Christmas lights were actually made locally, by Glaswegians, and formed the basis for many later display elements seen elsewhere. Prior to that, many of the features were obtained from Blackpool’s illuminations once they had been retired when those were updated. (That wasn’t just true of Glasgow, as I used to visit other illuminations, and slowly began to realise I was recognising items I’d seen before, in larger displays elsewhere).

Many of the elements were based on steel frames with rope lights attached. The rope lights were made of lights strung inside a clear plastic tube. Great fun for those who worked on them since they carry mains voltage and are joined by waterproof connectors. Well, you know what THAT means in Scotland – NOTHING’S waterproof in Scotland 😉

They were substantial, and stored from year to year for reuse, until the budget was steadily reduced, the street displays disappeared, and George Square became the centre of the council’s Christmas display.

Unfortunately, this find was sitting just behind a metal grid fence, so the pics aren’t the best thanks to its presence in front of the bells.

Click for bigger (sharper than the resized version below, and shows more detail).

George Square Bells

George Square Bells

I’ve passed the link to this post and pics on to someone involved in building these things many years ago, and will hopefully find out if they actually are what I think they are.

Update

Remarkably,I was right, and those are a couple of sections from George Square’s original home-brewed Christmas lights.

The story behind them, and their history is both fascinating and surprising.

I had no idea about their background.

If you have an hour or so to spare, and are in the least interested, I thoroughly recommend sitting down with your favourite treat, and enjoying this video from someone who knows better than me.

Incidentally, if you’re not familiar with these videos, I might add that there are more which show some more recent gems and reveals about the squares slightly more recent festive lighting.

 

18/08/2019 Posted by | Appeal, Civilian, council, Lost, photography | , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S46

Something a little different this week, as we move from consideration of the fire(s) and move onto intrigue – and a certain MP whose names seems to pop up in the media with some regularity these days.

I could be wrong, but with a crappy memory like mine, anything you can remember between appearances must be appearing fairly often.

Seventy staff have left Glasgow School of Art since the building suffered a second fire amid accusations of bullying and intimidation.

Forty staff have resigned since the blaze at the world-famous building designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, while 30 have been made redundant.

Six have signed confidentiality agreements with pay-offs to departing staff totalling £210,000.

It is unclear, however, if figures from the school’s HR department include the resignation of director Tom Inns who, sources suggest, received £250,000 when he left suddenly last year.

Investigations continue into risk management at the school before it was destroyed by fire in June last year and a report from by Scottish Fire and Rescue Service on the cause and origin of the second fire is expected within weeks.

MP Paul Sweeney believes pay-offs and confidentiality agreements must be scrutinised as official inquiries continue into the blaze and management of famous art school.

He said: “This speaks to a culture that is clearly not transparent. Light is the best disinfectant and a full independent public inquiry is long overdue.”

A former staff member at the school said many colleagues had left because of the management culture, including allegations of bullying and a lack of leadership from the art school board.

Seventy staff leave art school after second fire

Since this could go legal, I’d better not comment – or just suggest thinking of alternative reason for their departures is also valid.

I’ve taken a few spins by the remains of the old place, but other than some detail changes around the edges, the view is now pretty static, and taking more pics is pretty pointless as the changes would be next to impossible to see.

I think the perimeter has been further tightened, and some access gates removed from the fence.

It’s all pretty quiet to, with the most activity I saw recently being a (polite) comment emanating from one of the Portakabins (presumably housing some site security) as a girl walked up the hill during one of the now long distant heatwave days we had a few weeks ago.

Mackintosh Scott Street

Mackintosh Scott Street

18/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Oh look! A bus gate

But, don’t look too hard for it – they’re (almost) invisible.

It’s some years since we got a so called ‘Bus Gate’ in my corner of the east end. In fact, I’m still waiting to see it.

The only reason I know it’s there is because of the squeals and whines I seem to recall from some who objected to it.

Far from being a physical ‘gate’, it’s nothing more than a curve in the road with an extra set of traffic lights supposedly deterring drivers from taking the main street (where all the shops and wandering people are), and diverting via a more direct and less congested parallel street, leaving the main street for buses/shoppers.

With no control or penalties for driving along the main street – lazy idiot drivers continue to squeeze along the main street along with the buses (and everything else), leaving the parallel road as quiet as it ever was. But, at least we can cycle along it in relative peace. It’s almost twice the width of the main street too, even with cars parked along both sides. Before I was priced off the road, I used it anyway. It was, and still is, the smart way to go – which is presumably why all the dummies fight for space to get along the main street!

I mention this because I’m intrigued by news of a bus gate arriving in the city centre soon (September)…

TRAFFIC restrictions on two streets near Central Station in Glasgow City Centre come into force early next month.

‘Bus gates’ are being introduced on Union Street — from Gordon Street to Jamaica Street — and at Oswald Street, from Midland Street to Argyle Street, from Monday 2 September.

Between 7am and 7pm, only buses, taxis, private hires, cycles and goods vehicles will have access.

The council is advising motorist to use Wellington Street/Robertson Street as an alternative for southbound vehicles, and York Street/West Campbell Street for northbound vehicles. Diversion signs will be in place during the initial period of implementation.

TRAFFIC To Be Curbed On Two Busy Central Glasgow Streets

Click map for bigger.

Midland Street Bus Gates

Midland Street Bus Gates

This looks like it still misses a couple of really busy spots – that Hope Street section along the western side of Central Station is often jam packed with taxis, reducing the road to only two lanes, and that soon come to a halt as they manoeuvre, and buses stop, as it leaves only one lane for traffic flow. Stop a bus in that remaining lane, and the whole place stops. I’m not complaining, just making an observation being in a bus on that street almost every morning.

So, I’m wondering if someone has a plan to expand the ‘gate’ area one day.

It seems that with the current implementation, the bus gates can carry up to a total of 360 buses every hour at peak times and will act as a traffic filter that allows access to these streets for buses, taxis, private hire vehicles, bikes and goods vehicles.

The council says:

These new measures will improve journey times through the city centre and help to make the bus a more attractive travel option in Glasgow. Reducing traffic in such a busy part of town will also reduce the emissions that pedestrians breathe in and simply make it safer for people to walk around.

The Midland Street section is intriguing (part of it sees the bus, or cyclist, travel AGAINST the flow of traffic along a one way street), and an almost daily bus run for me, so I’ll be able to see what difference, if any, there is once these ‘gates’ come into play.

I’ve cycled on some parts which will fall within the gate controlled area, but only out of curiosity, since it’s possible to miss out this fairly busy section by following cycle routes along its edge.

It may be a few metres longer than staying on the road, but unlike some cycling activists, I value my health more than making a point, so the few minutes longer it might take (if the lights go against me) are well worth the investment.

Who knows, come September everyone might be able to relax in Midland Street, and enjoy the new murals as they amble through, rather than belting through as fast as they can while trying to beat the lights.

 

18/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, Transport | , , | Leave a comment

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