Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

‘City of Adelaide’ still sailing around after some 130 years

Saved from the farcical efforts of a Sunderland based madman, who stated in his own video that he hears the old clipper speaking to him – and who has also stated he will be bringing the hull back from Australia to Sunderland (despite not even raising enough interest or money to even move it from Irvine to Sunderland) – the ‘City of Adelaide’ (better known to Glaswegians as The Carrick) has been sailing again recently, as the hull of the former 1864 passenger ship had to be relocated about 200 metres to make way for housing development.

The hull remains on a barge (2,600 tonnes total weight with the hull on board) while work to preserve the remains continue as funds allow, and while local politicians and developers debate the location of the hull’s final home.

The new, temporary, site is expected to be the City of Adelaide’s home for the next two years after which it will most likely move to Dock Two — the State Government’s preferred site for a heritage shipyard.

But project organisers say they are open to other options such as Cruickshank’s Corner, where Alberton-based firm Southern Sea Eagles is planning a $5 million maritime tourist attraction.

The move — paid for by Renewal SA — cost about $50,000 and required the electricity to be disconnected, the gangway removed, and the barge to be turned around so it could be moved, involving some serious construction work requiring the hire of cranes, semi-trailers, trucks, and tugs, plus new construction around the resited barge.

Via The Port’s historic clipper ship is on the move and/or The Port’s historic clipper ship is on the move

There’s an amusing moment in a video included in the above article, where the presenter informs viewers the clipper sank and spent a year at the bottom of the ocean – in reality, it sank (many times in fact) while moored next to a bridge on the River Clyde in the middle of Glasgow, during the time it served as the RNVR Carrick, resting against these two piles.

Carrick berth

Carrick berth and former car parking area

Pictured below at the start of the first move to Australia, rescued from being ‘deconstructed’ (cut up and scrapped) at the Scottish Maritime Museum in Irvine.

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January 10, 2018 Posted by | Civilian, Maritime, Naval, Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

How is the Carrick, or City of Adelaide, faring in Australia

Far from being loaded onto a barge and returned to Sunderland (as some loonies who don’t have a penny to their plans promised a year or two ago) from Australia, once known as the Carrick in Scotland, the last surviving clipper ship, City of Adelaide, miraculously seems to be surviving life in Australia, and has neither burst into flames, or collapsed into a pile of dust, despite the scorn of those who failed to rally any tangible support or funds to keep the historic hull in this country – where the last fate it was promised (prior to rescue by the Australians) was to be cut it into pieces to get rid of it (it was blocking some development land in Irvine) in a ‘historic deconstruction’, a process we were told would allow historians to see how it was built. Little was said about the fate of the pile of firewood this vandalism would have left behind.

Despite the contempt with which those who claim to have better plans, but no serious backing or support, apparently continue to hold the Australians, and attempts to discredit them (by suggesting they have no money for their plans – which is really a bit silly, since few projects have ALL the funds in place up front, and do as the Australians are doing it, by raising what they can when they can, and proceeding as funds permit), have continued to look after the hull, and attract visitors to view the relic. Oh, and donations.

Probably the main hassle has been finding a permanent home, but that’s not really in their hands, as development of the potential sites is yet to be approved or carried out and is, unfortunately, down to politicians and competition, as commercial and tourist demands (amongst others) argue. It’s been almost a year since they last received any news on the site(s), with only one update during the year. Things are still not settled with the landowners.

From halfway around the world it’s hard to be accurate, or even make a decent guess, due to lack if freely available information.

While I do have some search bots that watch online for any news articles, one of the disappointing results has been that almost every news item I get alerted to only lets me see the first few lines of any story, since the media source carrying the story is locked behind a 100% paywall. There’s no offer of a free article, or a sample subscription for a week – the only option is a full subscription, or nothing.

There are, however, occasional radio interviews, and this one was released recently:

Interview on Radio Adelaide from 5 December 2017

Visit the clipper’s web site to stay up to date.

Clipper Ship City of Adelaide

I can’t ‘Pop along the road/beach’ for a quick pic, so it’s back to one taken before the hull departed.

Thankfully, this REAL oldie is shared on Flickr (thanks).

Said to be 19 April 1960.

Glasgow, 19 April 1960

Glasgow, 19 April 1960 – allhails (Allan)

 

December 19, 2017 Posted by | Civilian, Maritime, Naval, Transport | , , , | 2 Comments

Anstruther exhibition honours fishermen killed in the First World War

submarine

World War I was not confined to the more well known venue of The Front, but also extended into the sea, with German submarines deployed in order to disrupt supplies – fishermen working off the coast were potential targets:

A new exhibition has been launched to honour the fishermen who died in service during the First World War.

Anstruther was one of the fishing communities affected when war broke out, as fishermen were called to fight.

Many men from Scotland’s fishing industry went to fight in the conflict, and fishing regions were highly affected by the injuries and casualties they suffered.

David Christie from Anstruther sank a German U-boat in 1918. His granddaughter Davina Knox has the casing of the shell and his medal.

She said: “They were on a drifter patrolling the Irish Channel and they only had one gun on board the ship and this U-boat must have come up and they had a wee battle seemingly and they fired a direct hit and they took the 36 men prisoner. There was no loss of life.”

David Christie’s story features in a new exhibition at the Scottish Fisheries Museum in the town.

via Anstruther exhibition honours fishermen killed in the First World War | Dundee & Tayside | News.

The First World War had both personal and collective impacts on those involved, whether they were away fighting or at home.  In this exhibition we explore the specific effects that the war had on those who made their living from the sea.  Using objects from our collections and individual stories of those affected we paint a national picture of the war in Scotland’s coastal communities.

At the beginning of the war many fishermen entered the services and swapped the familiar hazards of life at sea for the dangers of the trenches or naval work.  For those who stayed at home fishing became severely restricted.  Fishermen were left with very small areas left to fish in and many boats were requisitioned for the Navy.

Exhibition Dates:

28th June – 26th October

Entry : included in museum admission, accompanied children FREE

A Shared Experience · What’s on · Scottish Fisheries Museum

June 30, 2014 Posted by | Maritime, military, Naval, Transport, World War I | , | Leave a comment

A sub on the Clyde

I always mean to share these sub pics (hard to find something that better links to ‘secret’), but always seem to get diverted by something or other, so decided to ‘try harder’ this time.

One reason I usually fail is because I like to identify things I mention, but in the case of the subs that show up on the Clyde, I don’t seem to have any obvious reference to check with in order to find out which one is on show – so I didn’t even bother this time.

As always, pics like these are courtesy of Zak, and you can see the rest for this day at: 20th June photo – Zak photos at pbase.com

June 20, 2014 Posted by | Naval, photography | , | Leave a comment

Helensburgh submarine museum funding on council agenda

submarine

I’ve been watching out for mentions of the proposed submarine museum in Helensburgh, and waiting until something positive appears that suggests it is moving forward and will materialise one day.

I’ve jumped on earlier mentions of forthcoming project of a similar nature in the past, because I want information about their existence to be out there, as it might be spotted by somebody who matters, but so far, feel as if I am getting my fingers burnt, as they all seem to fizzle out.

I’m not going to mention any specific past project, in case I say something wrong, as I am not privy to any special knowledge, but on the other hand, do know that one or two of these projects are still being pursued, but perhaps by different people and/or in slightly different directions.

So, back to the submarine museum:

Funding to the tune of £140,000 is also expected to be released by councillors for the Scottish Submarine Trust specifically towards the development of The Submarine Museum in Helensburgh. The condition of the funding mean the cash must be split evenly and released in two instalments of £70,000 when the following milestones are achieved; proof of legal ownership of the building; and receipt of Listed Building Consent. The museum aims to tell the history of the Royal Navy’s Submarine Service will be told using new media and immersive 3D projected imagery and exhibits.

A 39 tonne ‘X’ Craft – or mini submarine – will be displayed as the centrepiece to the museum, which will also house an interactive electronic memorial in Remembrance of the 5,329 submariners who have given their lives in the Royal Navy Submarine Service.

The project, which aims to attract 10,000 visitors to the Burgh, is spearheaded by Visit Helensburgh.

The museum will be within the hall of the former St Columba’s Church, and the company will take formal ownership of the property on March 28 of this year.

Via: Submarine museum on today’s council agenda | Helensburgh & Lomond | News | Helensburgh Advertiser

May 14, 2014 Posted by | council, Maritime, military, Naval, World War II | , , , | Leave a comment

The Carrick sank here, and here…

The clipper ship City of Adelaide spent some 44 years as the Carrick to Glaswegians, when it served as the floating premises of the RNVR (Scotland) Club, moored on the Clyde at Glasgow.

Unfortunately, it also sank (more than once) while it was there, and that seems to be what most folk remember.

It was towed away to rest at the Maritime Museum in Irvine, but with no funding to do anything with it, it just lay and decayed, with the possibility of demolition/deconstruction becoming a real possibility.

Eventually, the Australians came up with a plan and finding for it rescue, and it was loaded onto a barge and sailed around the World to Adelaide, where story still continues.

But it’s the local chapter that matters here, as the old berth on Clyde Street next to the city’s Victoria Bridge was the feature that caught our eye.

Carrick berth

Carrick berth and former members’ car parking area

While the vessel is long gone, the two massive timbers it rested against are still there, as is the top section of gangway, the service box that provided power from the land, and even some of the distribution panel at the top of the gangway.

This still has the ‘PRIVATE MEMBERS ONLY’ sign attached, but has been partly hidden by an electrical panel, presumably added in the latter days of the vessel’s presence at the berth, when some power was still required, but it was not longer in use as a club.

This reminds me that I did attend one wedding reception there, clearly after one of the sinkings, as the floor had a definite list, but nobody seemed to mind.

Carrick services

Carrick services (brick box), and gangway now isolated behind river fencing

Carrick panel

Carrick panel detail and ‘MEMBERS ONLY’ label

May 12, 2014 Posted by | Naval, photography | , , | Leave a comment

Web site dedicated to Bute at War returns to the Internet

Bute at War

Memorial web site returns

I was really pleased to see a media article which announced the return of a web site which had unfortunately evaporated due to unfortunate circumstances some years ago, and which I therefore thought had been lost forever, which would have been sad.

The site had been created as part of a much wider effort to mark the 60th anniversary of celebrations to mark V-Day on Bute. Considerable material was collected at the time, much of it not generally known, and a book was also published at the same time.

“Bute’s War”, a book by Jess Sandeman, who was a War veteran, former Chief WREN, and a long-time voluntary genealogist at the Bute Museum, was launched early in June 2005 to coincide with the island’s V-Day festivities. I was able to obtain a copy from the author, who ultimately passed away only a few years later, in August 2009.

Bute's War by Jess Sandeman 2005

Bute’s War

Circumstances, changes, and losses in the years following this event eventually saw the site disappear from the web, and my contacts were also lost, so I had no idea what happened to the content – fortunately, the person who actually organised it retained a copy, and the material is now back online.

There is a wealth of local information regarding the part the Isle of Bute played during the war – and it’s now so long since I saw the site I dare not try and summarise, rather just recommend it for a good trawl if you are at all interested in the area and its war time history:

Bute during World War II

See also: New website keeps Bute’s WW2 story alive – The Buteman

May 3, 2014 Posted by | Maritime, military, Naval, World War II | , , , , | 2 Comments

Submarine museum and St Peter’s seminary projects on council agenda

It’s a while since we saw the last positive rumblings regarding moves to preserve at least some of St Peter’s, but it looks as if the various ideas are gaining traction, and potential funding, as noted below.

I was also pleased to see positive reactions to the submarine museum which was proposed for Helensburgh. I’ve deliberately avoided mentioning this so far (in other words, I forgot, and also just never got round to it), because when I mentioned similar projects in the past… they just evaporated and never seemed to attract any interest. In my opinion, however, they were doomed before the started. The project I recall had projected funding requirement in the order of £10 million, and I would think that potential backers would have run a mile from such a suggestion, on the basis that they are not fools, and the knowledge that all these project end up way over budget. Starting with such a high initial figure may be honest, but in the real world, any smart backer would multiply their potential commitment by two or three to arrive at the figure they were likely to be asked to come up with to see the project through to completion – and would have run to the hills to hide.

COUNCILLORS will discuss the multi-million pound St Peter’s project and the Scottish Submarine Museum, amongst a busy agenda at today’s full council meeting.

On Thursday, March 20 elected members will meet in Kilmory Council Chambers where they will also be asked to release £25,000 funding to NVA at the beginning of the financial year 2014/15 for an Audience Development Strategy relating to the Kilmahew/ St Peter’s Project near Cardross.

The project – which will cost more than £7m in total – aims to transform the derelict site of the former St Peter’s Seminary buildings and the surrounding woodlands of Kilmahew which has lain abandoned for more than thirty years.

Situated on the edge of the village of Cardross, the site covers approximately 40 hectares and is predominately wooded. Each of the structures from medieval to modern is now in a ruinous state.

Funding to the tune of £140,000 is also expected to be released by councillors for the Scottish Submarine Trust specifically towards the development of The Submarine Museum in Helensburgh. The condition of the funding mean the cash must be split evenly and released in two instalments of £70,000 when the following milestones are achieved; proof of legal ownership of the building; and receipt of Listed Building Consent. The museum aims to tell the history of the Royal Navy’s Submarine Service will be told using new media and immersive 3D projected imagery and exhibits.

A 39 tonne ‘X’ Craft – or mini submarine – will be displayed as the centrepiece to the museum, which will also house an interactive electronic memorial in Remembrance of the 5,329 submariners who have given their lives in the Royal Navy Submarine Service.

The project, which aims to attract 10,000 visitors to the Burgh, is spearheaded by Visit Helensburgh.

The museum will be within the hall of the former St Columba’s Church, and the company will take formal ownership of the property on March 28 of this year.

via Submarine museum on today’s council agenda | Helensburgh & Lomond | News | Helensburgh Advertiser.

March 26, 2014 Posted by | Appeal, council, Naval, World War II | , , , | Leave a comment

Arctic Convoy naval hero leaves Bute for final journey

I was unaware of the presence of one of the recipients of the Arctic Star medal, who lived in Rothesay on the Isle of Bute until 2011, and passed his 100th birthday there.

Commander Ian Hamilton joined the Clyde division of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) in August 1932, then served in the Royal Navy from 1936 until 1957.

During World War II, he saw service in the Atlantic, the South Atlantic, the Mediterranean, the battles of Taranto and Matapan, the D-Day landings, and took part in the Arctic Convoys which carried supplies to Russian ports between 1941 and 1945, described by Churchill as “‘the worst journey in the world.’

His Arctic Star medal was presented at Erskine in April 2013 following approval by the Queen of an award to recognise the service of Royal Navy and Merchant Navy personnel. Commander Hamilton’s campaign medals already included the Naval General Service Medal, the 1939-45 Star, the Italy Star, the Africa Star, the Defence Medal, the War Medal, the Defence of Malta Medal and the Soviet Union’s Arctic Convoy Medal.

The body of Commander Ian Hamilton, who passed way in the Erskine home for former service personnel at Bishopton in Renfrewshire on February 9 at the age of 103, was piped on board MV Argyle, en route to his funeral at Greenock Crematorium.

Rothesay naval hero dies aged 103 – The Buteman

VIDEO: Lone piper gives Rothesay naval hero a fitting send-off – The Buteman

Seems this is another video source I can’t embed.

Fortunately, Zak was on hand to record the event (and I’m grateful for permission to use the occasional image):

February 21, 2014 Posted by | Maritime, military, Naval, World War II | , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Poppyscotland 2013

Looks like I have reverted to my old habit of giving Poppyscotland Home Page and Remembrance a late reminder – I think I’ll stop worrying about it.

However, and as usual, other things arose unexpectedly about a week a ago, and diverted my attention.

Poppyscotland

I’m crossing my fingers this year, as I have not been able to look at many news feeds recently, so hope that the usual stories seen in the past few years, telling of the sort of scum that steal collection boxes and money for the appeal, have actually not appeared, and not just been missed.

However, that does not mean that all is well, as we have seen a very bad year for thefts of metal from memorial and similar.

Sadly, while England has enacted new laws recently to make anonymous metal trading more difficult, Scotland is lagging behind, and has delayed moving on this, although we actually reported in last year’s article that “The Scottish Government proposed changes to the rules for scrap metal trading, removing the option of cash-in-hand payments in casual transactions“. Other than noting the deferral of this proposed deterrent, we have not noted any more positive actions against this growing theft.

Last year, we ended this with: Perhaps there will be something different to mention in a year’s time.

I’ll try something more imaginative his year…

Perhaps there will be something different to mention in a year’s time.

November 9, 2013 Posted by | Appeal, Civilian, Maritime, military, Naval, World War I, World War II | , , | Leave a comment

UAV flights in Scotland 2003-2013

I received an odd nudge to go look at Hansard for July 18, 2013, “You might see something interesting.”

Being a glutton for punishment, I duly trawled through a number of pages, fought off the urge to fall asleep, then came across a question on UAVs, which I guess was where I was supposed to look.

The question was asked of the UK, but this includes Scotland, so we got our little bit of info from the same pot:

Mr Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the answer to the hon. Member for Gillingham and Rainham of 15 May 2013, Official Report, column 221W, on unmanned aerial vehicles, on how many occasions flights of unmanned aerial vehicles have taken place in each of his Department’s reserved airspace areas within the UK in each of the last 10 years; what the purpose of each such flight was; and what type of unmanned aerial vehicle was flown on each such occasion. [R] [166283]

The reply was fairly comprehensive, as follows (I’ve highlighted the relevant line):

Mr Robathan: Available information on the number and location of flights of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), either on the military register or operating under a military flight test permit, in each of the last 10 years, is provided in the following table:

UAV type Number of flights Location Purpose
2003-06 Phoenix (1) (1) (1)
2004 Buster (2) Larkhill Trials
2006 Scan Eagle 22 Hebrides Range Capability Demonstration
2009 Desert Hawk III 126 Salisbury Plain Trials and Training
2010 Desert Hawk III 184 Salisbury Plain, Stanford, Otterburn Training and conversion to Role
Watchkeeper 11 West Wales Airport Trials
2011 Desert Hawk III 564 Salisbury Plain, Stanford, Otterburn Training
Watchkeeper 83 West Wales Airport Trials and Training
Tarantula-Hawk 3 Thorney Island Training
2012 Desert Hawk III 1,180 Salisbury Plain Training
Watchkeeper 129 West Wales Airport Trials and Training
Tarantula-Hawk 11 Thorney Island Training
Scan Eagle 5 South Coast Exercise Area Trials
2013 Desert Hawk III 555 Salisbury Plain, Stanford, Otterburn Training
Watchkeeper 6 West Wales Airport French Army Training
Watchkeeper 77 West Wales Airport Trials and Training
Black Hornet (3)n/a Lydd Camp, Lossiemouth, Salisbury Plain(4) Training

(1) The Phoenix Unmanned Air System, which retired from service in 2006, was flown in UK airspace. Records of the number, location and purpose of Phoenix sorties are no longer centrally available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. (2) Records of the number of Buster sorties are no longer centrally available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. (3) Because of the way Black Hornet is used the number of sorties and flying hours are not recorded. (4) The locations identified are the primary areas in which Black Hornet has been operated. Because of the weight and size of the air vehicle and the height at which it operates, under Military Aviation Authority regulations there is no requirement to limit flights to segregated airspace.

Via House of Commons Hansard Written Answers for 18 July 2013 (pt 0007)

Of 2,948 recorded flights (certain types were not recorded) , only 22 took place on the Hebrides Range, and those were class as Capability Demonstration flights.

ScanEagle

The UAV type is given as the Boeing ScanEagle (there is no space in the name, incorrectly shown in the Hansard table). The Royal Navy received its first unmanned ‘eye in the sky’ in a £30 million contract with Boeing to supply the ScanEagle reconnaissance aircraft. Built by Insitu, a subsidiary of Boeing Defence UK Limited, the ScanEagle is the first maritime-specific unmanned air system capability to be delivered in support of naval operations. The pilotless plane has been used by the US Navy over the past decade and has been trialled by the Royal Navy, aboard frigate HMS Sutherland back in 2006.

ScanEagle has a wingspan of just over 3 metres (10 ft), a weight of 22 kg (48 lb), and is launched from a pneumatic catapult.

ScanEagle Launch

ScanEagle Launch – Boeing image via MoD web site

The UAV flies at about 60 knots and is piloted by a specialist team on board the ship who plan its missions, control its flights, and monitor and analyse the information it gathers using its sensors, which includes a video or infra-red camera. Data is transmitted to the team, including real-time high-resolution images, via a satellite link.

ScanEagle

ScanEagle – Boeing image via MoD web site

It can remain airborne some 15 to 18 hours at distances of more than 70 miles from the mother ship. Boeing information on their web site indicates that later designs will substantially increase these figures.

ScanEagle

ScanEagle – Boeing image via MoD web site

Once the mission has been completed, the UAV returns to the ship where it is captured by being flown into a cable hung vertically from an extendible arm, and is caught by hooks located at the end of each wing. It is then grappled by a recovery device and lifted on board.

ScanEagle Recovery

ScanEagle Recovery – Boeing image via MoD web site

September 6, 2013 Posted by | Aviation, military, Naval, Surveillance | , , , , , | Leave a comment

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