Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

So, this old bank building WAS saved after all

Remember the old building I mention in Remember this Argyle Street building?

Seems it finally managed to go from an irreparable ruin that couldn’t be saved to Glasgow latest conversion to flats.

While the good old naysayers generally make their usual chant of ‘No No No’ regardless, I suspect only the most stubborn wouldn’t break the habit for this.

PLANNERS have agreed that a B-listed Glasgow City Centre building — once assessed by structural engineers as “incapable of repair” — can be converted into flats.

Four years ago plans were lodged to knock down the former commercial premises on Argyle Street at Miller Street and build student accommodation; it was only after the building was used as a giant advertising space that it was realised it could be saved.

A document submitted to Glasgow City Council by ZM Architecture explaining the new development stated: “In 2015, the previous owners proposed to demolish the building and the justification for this was based on detailed findings and a structural /economic assessment of the repair works needed to deal with a corroded structural frame.

“The scaffold that has been erected around the building for advertising…has allowed our conservation team with engineers David Narro Associates, to make a detailed independent assessment of the issues highlighted and the conclusion we are reaching is more favourable and that the building can be saved.

“Scaffold access has allowed tests to be carried out, a full stone fabric condition survey and structural frame opening up. This work is ongoing and a detailed stone enabling contract is to be organised so that full refurbishment of the façade can be undertaken with known risks and methods for stone replacement and treatment for frame conversion.”

FLATS Conversion Approved For Historic Glasgow Building That Was Under Threat Of Demolition

Retail space will continue in the ground floor and basement, while three flats will be created on each of the remaining levels.

Also…

If you ever follow my advice and “Look Up!” while walking around the city centre, you might have noticed a trend where many existing buildings have gained an extra floor, added to their roofs.

This is often grey, set back from the edge, and sometimes has sloping sides, all factors apparently intended to make the addition relatively invisible from the ground (unless you’re looking for it).

This conversion is no exception to this apparent ‘rule’, and explains why this is a common feature…

Remodelling of the roof profile is proposed under the new scheme. This involves a raised single storey element being added at the eighth floor for equipment space, and an extended upper level to create a ‘penthouse residential unit’. The front section of roof would become a private terrace “framed by a new formal elevation giving the building a new terminating storey.”

So, now we know – we’re not imagining it.

They’ll even be fixing the back of the place, which is currently visibly deteriorating.

A new element in a contemporary style would replace the existing brick rear section which is in poor structural condition.

The old place…

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

Now that the plans have been given the go-ahead, we’ll be spared the sight of disgusting sights like this…

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

Find some BETTER views than that thing in this old post about the building…

50 Argyle Street – Derelict Bank of Scotland plus more murals

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

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21/08/2019 Posted by | council, photography | , , , | Leave a comment

eBay’s Weegie howler lives on in Argyle Street

eBay’s unwitting derogatory advert to Glaswegians lives on in Argyle street days after it was highlighted by local media.

I suppose that’s what happens when you splash out so much cash on such a thing (it can’t be cheap to have an ad on 50 Argyle Street) – you either get it right and it’s worth it, or you play the “There’s no such thing as bad publicity” card, pretend you meant it, and try to keep a straight face.

(Is that Santa doing his Christmas shopping in Glasgow?  Look at the guy caught bottom left corner of the pic 🙂 )

eBay Weegie Advert Mistake

eBay Weegie Advert Mistake

This is so good…

I thought it deserved a bigger pic.

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

eBay Glasgow Weegie Advert Howler

02/12/2018 Posted by | Civilian, photography | , , , , | Leave a comment

50 Argyle Street – again

50 Argyle Street has appeared before, but this is no repeat.

Since there was news that this building is under consideration for saving, following a survey of the interior which indicated its condition was better than expected, the structure has been hidden by a huge (disgusting?) advertising banner.

I’d rather see the building, but then again, I seem to have resisted being brainwashed into accepting adverts being shoved in my face, and finding this sort of continuing abuse to be acceptable.

In previous posts about this building, I didn’t include any details of the entrance to this building in Miller Street, which has an impressive, but decaying, carving above.

So, here’s a look at that entrance, and a closer look at the carving.

50 Argyle Street Miller Street

50 Argyle Street Miller Street

Decaying carving detail.

Does anyone else see four ducks (wearing crowns)?

50 Argyle Street Miller Street Carving

50 Argyle Street Miller Street Carving

Bonus… The sign in the doorway.

Miller Street To Let Sign

Miller Street To Let Sign

14/10/2018 Posted by | photography | | Leave a comment

Remember this Argyle Street building?

I noted a long-abandoned building which seemed to have managed to survive despite the fact that it was lying empty.

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

The above was noted towards the end of 2017.

A few weeks ago I caught it looking a little different.

50 Argyle Street A

50 Argyle Street A

I couldn’t see or find anything obvious relating to what was happening, but now have come across more details.

Just three years ago plans were lodged to knock down the prominent B-listed former commercial premises on Argyle Street at Miller Street and build student accommodation.

A report at the time concluded, after intrusive investigation, that the building had “come to the end of its useful life”, was “incapable of repair short of complete dismantle/reconstruction” and should “therefore be demolished”.

That application was later withdrawn, the building changed owners, and now a new proposal to convert the upper floors into 21 flats has been drawn up. Retail space would continue in the ground floor and basement with three flats on each of the remaining levels.

A document submitted to Glasgow City Council by ZM Architecture explaining the new development states: “In 2015, the previous owners proposed to demolish the building and the justification for this was based on detailed findings and a structural /economic assessment of the repair works needed to deal with a corroded structural frame.

“The scaffold that has been erected around the building for advertising…has allowed our conservation team with engineers David Narro Associates , to make a detailed independent assessment of the issues highlighted and the conclusion we are reaching is more favourable and that the building can be saved.

“Scaffold access has allowed tests to be carried out, a full stone fabric condition survey and structural frame opening up. This work is ongoing and a detailed stone enabling contract is to be organised so that full refurbishment of the façade can be undertaken with known risks and methods for stone replacement and treatment for frame conversion.

More details can be found here.

HISTORIC Glasgow Building Judged To Have “Come To End Of Useful Life” Can Be Saved

19/08/2018 Posted by | photography | , , , | Leave a comment

50 Argyle Street – Derelict Bank of Scotland – redevelopment underway

Although I’d read about this building having been bought, and redevelopment set to begin, sceptical me forgot about it until this chance pass one recent night.

It’s lain unused for so long, nicely decorated with some murals, that even reading such news is no guarantee of action, as a look at similar reports will confirm if you pay attention to them. Good ideas unfortunately become bad ideas when the changing demands and promises of market prediction come into play.

But, this one seems to have arrived in reality.

As usual, I can’t be bothered hunting through the planning applications to see what’s being done, so I’ll just be trying to remember to have the occasional look and see what eventually arrives.

I ended up with two pics.

First was a wide or landscape view, not too bad for perspective distortion (corrected) but couldn’t really catch the full height of the building.

50 Argyle Street A

50 Argyle Street A

I tried the same view in tall or portrait orientation, which gave a little more of the taller part of the building, but was harder to correct and process.

50 Argyle Street B

50 Argyle Street B

This one proved educational for me.

I normally work with the hi-res original, which is huge compared to the version that ends up in the blog, and carry out most of the edits there.

I’ve always wondered if the difference was visible if the edits were carried out on a smaller version.

I got the order of work wrong with this, and had to redo all the edits (I had reduced the size before realising I hadn’t corrected the alignment) – the final result was embarrassing mush.

I guess it DOES make a difference – especially with low light images.

27/05/2018 Posted by | photography | , , , | Leave a comment

50 Argyle Street – Derelict Bank of Scotland plus more murals

I hadn’t really noticed the murals concealing the ground floor of the building at 50 Argyle Street (extending around into Miller Street) before, but my recent habit of spotting them now we have a deliberate mural trail in Glasgow seems to make be notice them.

50 Argyle Street was built in 1905 and is said to follow an American style (not to mention the Glasgow Style and others) which to my eye seems accurate. It’s an 8 story building described as being built for the Trustees of Mrs Mary Goodson (I have no idea), with the ground floor being occupied by the Bank of Scotland.More recently retail, now unoccupied, as are the floors above.

The building has been unoccupied for some time, derelict, decaying, and now considered to be at risk. Specifically:

27 October 2015: Local planners advise Full Planning Permission and Listed Building Consent for the demolition of the building and erection of a mixed use development are being sought ref: 15/01492/DC & 15/01493/DC. Risk Level raised to High.

Although not immediately evident, it seems the exterior is disintegrating, and a closer look reveals extensive areas of protective mesh have been fixed to retain fractured material and prevent it falling onto the street below.

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

50 Argyle Street And Miller Street

Closer look at the safety retaining mesh:

50 Argyle Street Mesh

50 Argyle Street Mesh

Rather than go back and try for pics of the murals, I thought I’d play with what I already had, to see if they could be reasonably extracted from the images earlier shots (one other taken of the Argyle Street elevation).

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

50 Argyle Street Panel 1

 

50 Argyle Street Panel 2

50 Argyle Street Panel 2

 

50 Argyle Street Panels 3 And 4

50 Argyle Street Panels 3 And 4

 

50 Argyle Sreet Miller Street Panels

50 Argyle Street Miller Street Panels

Clearer view of Panel 4 – reveals the bear has a fish for dinner.

50 Argyle Street Panel 4

50 Argyle Street Panel 4

Not too bad overall, with the main problem for me being the obscured areas lost to passer-by in front of some areas.

The day wasn’t particularly bright so the higher than desirable ISO setting (for making such small crops) means noise starts to become apparent, but given the minimal processing applied (I didn’t want to spend a lot of time on this exercise), I’m not complaining.

23/10/2017 Posted by | Civilian, photography | , , | Leave a comment

   

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