Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

My brain hurts – I must have been trying to read a Scottish ferry article

Yup, THAT was careless of me.

I used to enjoy travelling on the occasional ferry. I even managed to do a little work on some of them, and had some ‘free’ trips along the Clyde as they went to the trials area. That was even more fun – normal ferry journeys don’t include running the engines up to full power with the rudder hard over, sailing in circles with the stabilisers fully deployed to keep the vessel level. We even managed to blow cylinder heads on one trip (and they’re big on ferries that can carry up to 500 passengers and 120 cars).

While I’m still interested, it’s no fun following the fates of both the old vessels (retired) and the new, as the news never seems to be good.

It used to be intriguing as various people and groups claimed they could operate and maintain the services better than CalMac, but never really had to worry about actually delivering since the chances of them winning the work were slim, but they cost everyone else millions thanks to their challenges.

Fast forward something in the order of twenty years, and it seems that little has changed, with millions apparently still being gobbled up by side issues (as opposed to running costs and subsidies), plus RET (road equivalent tariff), howled about and demanded for years, yet apparently the ‘wrong thing’ when it was introduced. Apparently what should have been applied was a journey pricing system in use by air carries. No, I’m NOT going to summarise this one in then words or less.

And, I digress (and it’s not even reducing the pain).

Here’s another chapter to add the disaster which has grown from the opportunity to create new ferries…

Ministers reject Ferguson shipyard share ownership bid

Far too much political nonsense and blame being concentrated on.

All concerned really do seem to have lost the plot, and completely forgotten the idea was to develop and build two new technology ferries.

Can’t wait for the next chapter.

Hole in Boat

Advertisements

01/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, Maritime, Transport | , , | Leave a comment

The absurd Elves of Camden and London

ScissorsSometimes you have to put some effort into making a point, or consciously orchestrate a crusade, but it seems I wouldn’t have to do either if I wanted to actively campaign against the abuse of Health & Safety guidelines, or those who like to employ it while wearing their Jobsworth caps.

This time it’s the tale of self-employed dressmaker Lorna Watts, who was refused the loan of a pair of scissor while in the Holburn Library in central London – the reason for the refusal  being that she “might stab a member of staff”. It may be worth noting that Ms Watts is 26 years of age, so not likely to be a drunken or drug-crazed teenager in hiding.

Ms Watts, from Islington, north London, said: “I asked why I couldn’t borrow a pair of scissors and she said, ‘they are sharp, you might stab me’. I then asked to borrow a guillotine to cut up my leaflets but she refused again – because she said I could hit her over the head with it!” She continued with the observation that if that had been her wish, then there were plenty of big, heavy books lying around the library that could easily have been used to achieve the same aim.

The businesswoman then visited another three libraries in north London but her request was rejected in each of them.

A spokeswoman for the (real)  Health and Safety Executive said there was no policy in place on lending sharp implements, and that while it is true that those in the workplace would be expected to adopt a common sense approach, this could be a case of someone misinterpreting the rules.

A spokeswoman for Camden Council, which runs the library, has apologised and said it would investigate the incident. However, the reality is that having reached this stage, the council has already shown that it is incompetent, and wonder how long it will be before the library staff are safely installed behind metal bars, bulletproof glass and powered steel shields which rise from the counter, with screens and intercoms separating them from the dangers of dealing directly with the public, and the council bankrupt from paying liability insurances premiums, lest the library staff receive a paper cut from a dangerous printed book. At least an eBook doesn’t carry that hazard – just the danger of RSI.

As I have observed before, if you made up these stories, no-one would believe you.

Given the references to common  sense in this sad tale, I’m reminded of one of grandfather’s observations of dealing with customers in his shop, and which was that common sense was a worryingly uncommon thing – and he was born before 1900.

26/09/2009 Posted by | Civilian | , , | Leave a comment

Elfin Safety strikes again

Banana skinI usually reserve the Elfin Safety jibe for stories that can be attributed to Jobsworth types that have found some Health & Safety Executive (HSE) recommendation or guideline that they can selectively misinterpret to suit themselves in some way, usually to the detriment of the subject, or to same themselves some work.

Part of the problem, as can be seen by reading the full text of the news item behind this post, is that much of this reaction is motivated by fear, either of being sued in the event that something happens which can be construed to have arisen from ignoring HSE guidance, or of having insurance cancelled or refused for the same reason.

This is fair enough in cases where activities are inherently dangerous or hazardous, but begins to look increasingly ridiculous in cases where activities have carried on for years with little or no problem arising, and the risk is more theoretical than actual. At least that’s what I’m assuming, and the graveyard at St Michael’s Church in Heston isn’t full of wardens who’ve given their lives over the years, in order to keep the clock running since 1793.

That’s where the Truro Dioscean Guild of Ringers has received advice from the HSE about unsupported ladders, and decided that climbing the 8 foot ladder in order to wind the clock in the church tower three times per week is too “dangerous” for the warden.

The job is now seen as so dangerous that the Diocese of Truro reports that organisations are pledging money towards the cost of an automatic rewinder at a cost of £5,500, so the warden will no longer have to risk his life three times per week.

Unfortunately, there’s no mention of how they are going to get the automatic winder installed once they’ve bought it. After all, if it’s so dangerous to climb the ladder to merely wind the clock, how are they going to justify the danger for anyone that might undertake the much more complex task of installing the winder?

It’s a wonder we’re allowed to step outside our own front doors these days, for fear of treading on a…

19/09/2009 Posted by | Civilian | , | Leave a comment

Elfin Safety beats hospital volunteers

Mad Hatter's tea partyWorking though a bit of backlog, I was sad to see that an earlier item which had noted Elfin Safety used to ban Bute hospital tea parties was soon followed up with more bad news.

I read that not only had the Jobsworth NHS manager that imposed the ban managed to scupper the tea parties, but she also led to the disbanding of the group that had organised them.

The Friends of the Annexe came together some 12 years ago, and in that time were able to raise over £30,000 to help with the Victoria Hospital Annexe on the Isle of Bute, and enhanced the lives of those who were homed in the facility, which accommodates long-stay patients.

The matter arose when an NHS hotel services manager caught the group holding a tea party for the patients, where friends and family could bring cakes and biscuits to be enjoyed by the patients, and the manager announced that the parties could no longer continue unless the Friends obtained suitable food handling training and qualifications.

For what it’s worth, this is surely nothing more than Jobsworth nonsense. If we take the story at face value, and all that was involved was tea, cakes, and biscuits, then what food handling training and qualifications would apply? I would assume that the hospital’s own nursing staff would be looking after any individual dietary requirements of the patients, which a food handling certificate has nothing to do with, so is not relevant. There would be no cooking involved, so temperature control and the potential cross-contamination of cooked and raw food is not relevant either.

I think patients, and visitors, are more likely to be at risk of something being spread from the hospital’s own tea trolley, as it wanders throughout the hospital, rather than a packet of digestive biscuits bought the same day from the nearby supermarket.

Disbanded

In two open letters published in the island’s newspaper, The Buteman, both the chairperson and the secretary of The Friends of the Annexe expressed their thanks to all those who had contributed to the success of the Friends over the years, and for what they had achieved.

Friends say farewell after tea party row

Rather than add to speculation regarding the matter, I’d like to quote from chairperson Janette Henderson’s letter:

As chairperson of the ‘Friends of the Annexe’ I feel I must put a few things straight with regard to our tea parties at the Annexe.

As a committee we were told by a staff member that we were not allowed to have these events up at the Annexe again. Seemingly, it had been discussed at a hospital meeting that the strawberry tea could take place on the date planned, but we would have to be notified that we could not run this kind of event at the hospital unless we had food handling certificates.

A staff member announced this without the permission of the hotel services manager – and in a way that was quite daunting, when we had prepared and were opening the event in 30 minutes.

We were upset, but I have since had a meeting with the administrating team at the Annexe and have had it explained that we were certainly allowed to go ahead that day – but in the future, only those with a food handling certificate would comply with the regulations of the hospital.

I can quite understand this, as we are working with patients who could succumb to a further complication in their condition.

Giving the falling numbers of Friends (three are said to have retired this year) and the requirement of the health and hygiene regulations now being imposed on them, the Friend have decided to  “quit while they are ahead” and announced their disbandment.

It is with regret that we have come to the conclusion that health and hygiene regulations now prohibit us from fundraising at the Annexe.

The committee has decided to forward any remaining funds to NHS Highland, to be used for the Victoria Annexe equipment fund, and to close their accounts.

Robert McKirdy
Secretary/treasurer, Friends of the Annexe

I’m afraid I still feel less charitable than the Friends, and have had numerous relations who have had to endure long-term stays in hospital, and anything at all that could brighten even one day was highly valued and appreciated, and looked forward to with great anticipation.

It’s difficult to put into words the light that appears in their eyes when they see someone arrive to spend some time with them and break the monotony of a long-term stay.

Granted, the Friends may have been retiring at some point soon in any case, but the fact is they are gone from the Annexe now, and it would seem that there is no-one to take their place, and that anyone that does will have to have qualifications – a barrier to volunteer work. And if we really are talking about cakes and biscuits, surely an over-reaction?

The real losers here must surely be the patients, and worst of all, those who have no family or friends that may have visited them, and for whom the Friends brought a little joy to.

// <!–Friends say farewell after tea party row–><!–A GROUP of local volunteers who have helped raise more than £30,000 for patients at the Victoria Hospital Annexe in Rothesay has decided to disband – just weeks after being told food handling regulations would stop them holding their regular fund raising tea parties.
–><!–Rothesay Bute Victoria “NHS Highland” Annexe–>

Premium Article !

Your account has been frozen. For your available options click the below button.

Options

Premium Article !

To read this article in full you must have registered and have a Premium Content Subscription with the n/a site.

Subscribe

Registered Article !

To read this article in full you must be registered with the site.

Friends say farewell after tea party row

Volunteers disband after raising more than £30,000
Click on thumbnail to view image
Click on thumbnail to view image
Click on thumbnail to view image
Click on thumbnail to view image
Click on thumbnail to view image
Published Date:
13 August 2009

A GROUP of local volunteers who have helped raise more than £30,000 for patients at the Victoria Hospital Annexe in Rothesay has decided to disband – just weeks after being told food handling regulations would stop them holding their regular fund raising tea parties.

The Friends of the Annexe committee decided this week to disband the organisation after spending more than 12 years raising funds to help improve the facilities and lives of the long term patients in the Townhead building.

Last month, just before

// <![CDATA[
var adPos = 0;
if (top != self)
{
try { adPos = parent.GetNextAdNum(); } catch(err) { adPos = parent.parent.GetNextAdNum(); }
}
else
{
adPos = GetNextAdNum();
}

document.write(”);
// ]]> <a href=”http://ad.uk.doubleclick.net/jump/buteman.jp/news;channel=editorial;pos=mpu;sectionid=2568;sz=300×250;mtfIFPath=/template/expandables/;ord=123456789?&#8221; target=”_blank”> <img src=”http://ad.uk.doubleclick.net/ad/buteman.jp/news;channel=editorial;pos=mpu;sectionid=2568;sz=300×250;mtfIFPath=/template/expandables/;ord=123456789?&#8221; width=”300px” height=”250px” border=”0″ alt=”Click Here” title=”Click Here” /> </a>

the start of their annual strawberry tea, held at the Annexe since the group was formed in 1997, the group was told by an NHS manager that they would not be allowed to hold similar events in future unless they had the appropriate food handling certificates.

But the group’s chairperson, Janette Henderson, says other factors are behind the committee’s decision to cease the Friends’ activities.

“We have decided that we would disband the Friends of the Annexe,” Mrs Henderson wrote in a letter to this week’s issue.

“We are all getting a little older, and recently we have had three members having to retire, and we feel that maybe we should all stand aside – in other words, quit while we are ahead.”

However, the Friends’ secretary and treasurer, Robert McKirdy, in another letter to this week’s issue, says the dispute over the tea parties was behind the decision to disband.

“It is with regret that health and hygiene regulations now prohibit us from fund raising at the Annexe,” Mr McKirdy wrote.

“The committee has decided to forward any remaining funds to NHS Highland to be used for the Victoria Annexe equipment fund, and close their accounts.”

Both letters are published in full below.

The money raised has allowed the annexe to buy new equiment such as pressure mattresses or fridges and recently redecorate the entrance hall and patients’ dayroom.

Viv Smith, NHS Highland’s locality manager for Cowal and Bute, said: “The Friends have worked closely with local health care staff on Bute, and we thank them for their many kind gifts for the Annexe and their hard work and dedication to patients.”

*******************
Friends end their fund raising

As chairperson of the ‘Friends of the Annexe’ I feel I must put a few things straight with regard to our tea parties at the Annexe.

As a committee we were told by a staff member that we were not allowed to have these events up at the Annexe again. Seemingly, it had been discussed at a hospital meeting that the strawberry tea could take place on the date planned, but we would have to be notified that we could not run this kind of event at the hospital unless we had food handling certificates.

A staff member announced this without the permission of the hotel services manager – and in a way that was quite daunting, when we had prepared and were opening the event in 30 minutes.

We were upset, but I have since had a meeting with the administrating team at the Annexe and have had it explained that we were certainly allowed to go ahead that day – but in the future, only those with a food handling certificate would comply with the regulations of the hospital.

I can quite understand this, as we are working with patients who could succumb to a further complication in their condition.

16/09/2009 Posted by | Civilian | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ludicrous PC pudding renaming

This story may arise across not one, but two borders from home, however it caught my eye as it arose on the menu of the canteen at Flintshire Council Headquarters in Mold, a place I have enjoyed passing through during sorties into North Wales. While I would say the scenery is reminiscent of that found in Scotland, I’m sure the locals would invert the compliment – it would be hard to tell the difference if parachuted into the countryside. Both areas share the same scenic beauty.

However, only in that Mold canteen are you likely to be presented with a menu offering the intriguingly named Spotted Richard, or more understandable (and acceptable – as it just plain English) Sultana Sponge – and discover that all you get served is good old ordinary Spotted Dick.

I have to emphasise the fact that this daft story arises not because of an official council or policy decision, with one councillor going so far as to say the move was “political correctness gone mad”, and the concil itself stating that catering staff made the decision after “immature comments” and it was not a policy decision.

Flint councillor Klaus Armstrong Braun has even made an official complaint about the name change, branding it as “ludicrous”, and pointing at that it had cost the council, as new signs had to be made to accommodate the change. He added that the bosses who had made the decision would soon be “frightened of their own shadow”.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

The world has managed to survive since the 19th century, when a portion of suet pudding containing dried fruit was first served up, and the name Spotted Dick was born – with the spotted part describing the appearance of the fruit as spots on the pudding, and the dick part probably being derived from the word dough, or the ending of the word pudding.

While the original name of the dish may be a cause for humour amongst some, it’s confined to the childish and immature, and rather than pander to their provocation, surely it’s better to simply respond to their bait with a poker face, and reply to their obvious questions by stating that that it’s cake with currants, and ask if they want a portion. According to a nearby pub, that not only shuts them up, it also confirms they weren’t interested in ordering it – case proven?

As with the folk that gripe about Google Street View being an invasion of their privacy, and consequently bring hordes of people searching for views of their homes on the internet, the canteen staff at Mold probably kept jumping up and down, complaining about being harassed, and giving the kids a good laugh when asked about their Spotted Dick, when they should just have ignored them and stuck to the facts. With no response to their provocation, they give up, but if they know they’re going to get a show each time, then they carry on.

The worst aspect of this story is really the possibility of political correctness introducing another change in our language.

As the conclusion of the BBC News report notes, can we now expect to see the censoring of the Knickerbocker Glory, chicken breasts, and jam tarts, to name a few? And what will geologists do in future, if they can’t show examples of cleavage?

While language will always change and evolve, and things will enter and leave common use, doing so in response to the pc brigade is not, in my opinion, a good enough reason for such change.

08/09/2009 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , | Leave a comment

Elfin Safety used to ban Bute hospital tea parties

Mad Hatter's tea partyYet another example of an over-zealous Jobsworth using Health & Safety claims to justify spoiling someone else’s fun, and reminds us of our earlier story regarding the Inverclyde Royal Hospital tea bar to be axed. Again, I think my money would be safe if I took bets that the real Health & Safety Executive would say “Nothing to do with us” if they were asked.

This time it’s an NHS hotel services manager who was visiting the Victoria Hospital Annexe on the Isle of Bute, and caught members of the Friend of the Annexe while their setting up their annual strawberry tea (which has been held there for the past 12 years) – and told them it would be the last such event at the Annexe. The visiting NHS manager told the Friend that the food they were bringing on to the premises did not meet specific food handling requirements.

In a statement to the local paper, The Buteman, Jeanette Henderson (the Friends’ chairperson) said: “I understand why it’s happened, and the lady’s concerns, but I think they could have put it a better way. I have written a letter to her saying I was disappointed they hadn’t been told me personally. I’m quite willing for them to train us in food handling as that is really the issue. It was just so badly done on Wednesday.”

The group’s secretary, Robert McKirdy, told told the paper he wanted to see the order in writing before making any decisions.

An NHS spokesman said the food handling requirements were there for the good of the patients, and that they had to be very careful about what food was brought into a hospital, adding “We strongly recognise the importance local charities play in the upkeep of these hospitals, and do not wish to cause any unnecessary distress.  We would be happy to work with the Friends and staff there to solve this issue, and help them meet the requirements we are obliged to uphold.”

I’d like to have heard that the manager involved had been sent on a course to teach her some of the skills needed in dealing tactfully with other people. I can only wonder at how fast anyone wanted to get out of any hotel she ever managed. There are ways to deal with people and sensitive issues, and she does not seem to be aware of them – either that, or the Jobsworth tag is justified.

Friends of the Annexe

According to the article, the Friends have run fund raising functions over the years to support the Annexe, and have raised in excess of £30,000 in their time, and supported the redecoration of one of the halls, and funded the purchase of four new mattresses.

The hospital homes long-stay patients, people who may once have had their own homes, and the volunteers say the tea parties brightened up their day and provided the opportunity for them to see people and have a chat.

The parties allowed friends and family to bring their own cakes and biscuits to be enjoyed, and these are hardly food items that can cause problems and need particularly specialised or careful handling, such as meat and dairy products.

When other members of the committee heard of the announcement that the tea parties were banned, they were said to be furious at the news.

20/07/2009 Posted by | Civilian | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

More Health & Safety nutters

Elephant on bikeAt least when I relate tales like this, it’s not because I’ve spent hours trawling the net, but have merely glanced over the articles that a few selected feeds have deemed interesting, and offered to me for consideration. A few minutes can dispatch 20-3o stories to history.

For those who like to crusade mad Health & Safety causes though, I’m beginning to think there’s a bunch of folk out there who have nothing better to do than sit for hours and work how they can complain about something, and claim that other people’s Health & Safety is compromised by something that those of us who live in the real world have no problem with – probably because we haven’t lost touch with reality – yet.

I seem to recall a recent Barnardo’s advert came in for their attention, because the behaviour depicted – a girl being beaten about the head repeatedly and descending into addiction – could result in brain damage. (Somehow, I think that might have been the message).

Now they’ve had a go at a Coke advert, which depicts a singer called Duffy cycling through a supermarket. Personally, I can’t stand the noise she makes (some call it singing apparently, but that’s not the issue), and you won’t find me paying for a name stuck on some overpriced sweet water, but once again, poor old Health & Safety is being trotted out by self-appointed experts, as 18 people complained the singer was not wearing reflective clothing and her bicycle had no lights in the advert.

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) also said four viewers worried children could copy her behaviour.

Coca-Cola argued the ad was supposed to reflect “Duffy’s fantasy”, and shows the singer coming offstage before sipping from a can and then  cycling through dark streets and into the store, before returning to her concert in time to perform an encore. The drinks company argued that the commercial depicted the singer’s escape from the pressures of stardom and was “far removed from the real world”.

It also said they had gone through a “vigorous” production process to ensure the scenes met Highway Code criteria for riding a bicycle on public roads. The regulations recommend cyclists wear reflective clothing in the dark, and the company pointed out that the singer had worn a black and white sparkly top that stood out, while the bicycle she was riding had lights on the front and rear in each shot.

Following its investigation, the ASA did not uphold the complaints, noting the “fantasy context” and deciding that older children would understand cycling round a supermarket was not a realistic situation.

These people who have nothing better to do really don’t deserve the time of day, and are offered far too much tolerance.

I would propose that our Health & Safety would be better served if time was not wasted in the obligatory process of giving their stupid opinions credibility.

As with the insane legal claims for fat payouts which the “No Win No Fee” mentality has promoted – and led to a preliminary review stage to weed out claims such as the classic claim made for sore because a shopping centre’s floor was “too hard” – maybe someone with should be appointed to review the Health and Safety claims from time-wasters.

I expect I’ll now hear from the animal cruelty brigade because I have an elephant riding a penny farthing bicycle in this post, and the Health & Safety lot because it has no helmet, reflective jacket, armbands, or lights, and is probably overloading its bike as well, just for good measure. Maybe it should both have, and be insured as well, in case it falls off and lands on somebody, and they injure it!

Guess I spent too much time in the real world of Health & Safety, in industry, where people stood to get killed, or lose bits of their bodies if things were not done right, and not in “fantasy world”.

17/06/2009 Posted by | Civilian | , , | 1 Comment

See Rothesay, See Alcatraz

barbed wireIt’s often said that the so-called War Against Terrorism has already been lost because we’re now shooting one another, locking people up without trial, and sleepwalking into a surveillance society marked by CCTV and Identity Cards that mean no-one in Britain is really “free” any longer (unless they’re criminals that ignore the law anyway – they can do as they please). Now we have the insanity of Government legislation on the security of ports and the people and ships that use them.

Time was that you could get up in the morning and amble off to Bute/Rothesay for the day without much pre-planning, then “security” and undisclosed Government security requirements brought us “shore ticketing. Previously you just arrived and drove on to the ferry and bought your tickets from the Purser during the crossing, now you have to turn up early enough to buy your tickets from the ticket office on land, and there’s a whole raft of new rules and regulations that came along with that change too, which the unwary or inexperienced can fall foul of.

Now, it seems that Rothesay pier is to be permanently closed to the public by an eight foot high security fence topped with barbed wire, and it’s due to be installed mid-August, the busiest time of the year as the Bute Highland Games take place then. The fence will stretch from the Albert Pier to the moorings, with gaps for passengers and vehicles.

The fence will be supported by 3-metre tall steel posts, spaced at 3 metre intervals, carrying welded mesh steel sheets 2.5 metres high, and topped of by three strands of barbed wire.

The fence is said to be needed to comply with the Department of Transport’s ‘Transec’ policy on the protection of passengers, ports and shipping.

The question of Planning Permission for the installation was raised, but brought the response that it would probably be classified as “permitted development”.

Councillor Isobel Strong added: “I think this is security gone mad. Do the powers that be think that Rothesay is in the forefront of international terrorism, and that a high fence with barbed wire is necessary?”

Brian Fulton, Caledonian MacBrayne’s regional manager for Bute, said the decisions on the need for the fence and its erection and design had been taken without any involvement from the company.

(Maybe it’s all a horrible mistake, and it’s just a leaked proposal to protect the islanders from the drunken neds that think they can arrive on the island and behave as they please.)

Visit the Buteman web site, where you can read the full Outrage at Rothesay pier fence plan story and register to pass an opinion on this “wisdom”.

26/06/2008 Posted by | Civilian | , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Stirling Council loses the place

Stirling council has clearly lost contact with reality, or has never employed anyone to train them in any of the concepts of Customer Realtionships.

Marie McGrath, of Tullibody near Stirling, has been fined £35 for displaying her parking ticket upside down – Stirling council said that although the ticket was displayed, wardens could not read it.

A Stirling Council spokeswoman said: “The conditions of use of our car parks, clearly displayed at each car park entrance, indicate that a valid ticket must be displayed within the vehicle. In this case a ticket was displayed but it was not possible for the car park attendants to determine whether or not it was valid so an excess charge notice was correctly served.  It is the responsibility of the vehicle owner to comply with the conditions of use.”

Mrs McGrath said: “I found the fine on my windscreen and noticed the ticket was upside down. I thought it was clear I had made an attempt to display a ticket but when I contacted the council with evidence about it they ignored it and then ended my appeal process. I think the council could show a bit of common sense. I’ve got the ticket to prove I had bought one. It’s not like I was intending to defraud them or looking to deliberately park illegally.

Another example of picking on a Soft Target instead of putting in some real effort and chasing deliberate fraudsters, it’s enough to make you jump in your car and go park in Stirling just to make sure you display your ticket upside down, then go get Nick Freeman to take up the case.

Come to think if, Yours Truly has been due a fine every time he’s parked using such systems, since he’s never stuck the ticket to his windscreen as per the instructions. Not wanting to have any sticky stuff to clean off, it always goes on top of the dash, easy to read, but clearly ignoring the rules – I’ll let you know if I ever get issued with a fine.

08/03/2008 Posted by | Civilian | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

   

%d bloggers like this: