Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Mackintosh Building S46

Something a little different this week, as we move from consideration of the fire(s) and move onto intrigue – and a certain MP whose names seems to pop up in the media with some regularity these days.

I could be wrong, but with a crappy memory like mine, anything you can remember between appearances must be appearing fairly often.

Seventy staff have left Glasgow School of Art since the building suffered a second fire amid accusations of bullying and intimidation.

Forty staff have resigned since the blaze at the world-famous building designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh, while 30 have been made redundant.

Six have signed confidentiality agreements with pay-offs to departing staff totalling £210,000.

It is unclear, however, if figures from the school’s HR department include the resignation of director Tom Inns who, sources suggest, received £250,000 when he left suddenly last year.

Investigations continue into risk management at the school before it was destroyed by fire in June last year and a report from by Scottish Fire and Rescue Service on the cause and origin of the second fire is expected within weeks.

MP Paul Sweeney believes pay-offs and confidentiality agreements must be scrutinised as official inquiries continue into the blaze and management of famous art school.

He said: “This speaks to a culture that is clearly not transparent. Light is the best disinfectant and a full independent public inquiry is long overdue.”

A former staff member at the school said many colleagues had left because of the management culture, including allegations of bullying and a lack of leadership from the art school board.

Seventy staff leave art school after second fire

Since this could go legal, I’d better not comment – or just suggest thinking of alternative reason for their departures is also valid.

I’ve taken a few spins by the remains of the old place, but other than some detail changes around the edges, the view is now pretty static, and taking more pics is pretty pointless as the changes would be next to impossible to see.

I think the perimeter has been further tightened, and some access gates removed from the fence.

It’s all pretty quiet to, with the most activity I saw recently being a (polite) comment emanating from one of the Portakabins (presumably housing some site security) as a girl walked up the hill during one of the now long distant heatwave days we had a few weeks ago.

Mackintosh Scott Street

Mackintosh Scott Street

Advertisements

18/08/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New Sauchiehall Avenue Scheme STILL blocked

As some be aware, the new ‘Avenue’ scheme was completed through Sauchiehall Street last week.

Unsurprisingly, rather than see any sort of happiness being reported on the various so-called ‘Social Media sites, most of what I saw was miserable people with nothing better to do than spend their time complaining and naysaying.

I believe that, over the past week, I could have collected a huge gallery of images showing every out of alignment paving block, every crack, every repair, fix, or piece of road work which can be found on the Avenue.

But – I’d be hard pressed to find ANY ‘Social Media’ offering from people who are actually PLEASED to see the Avenue completed and in place.

So…

Why the heck should I be any different, and NOT join the mindless masses and their whining?

After all, when I went for a ride along the new cycle path along Sauchiehall Street, as you can see from the pic below, it was STILL BLOCKED!

Sauchiehall Avenue Blocked

Sauchiehall Avenue Blocked

All I can say is that I hope the morons are enjoying themselves – with their response, I wouldn’t blame Glasgow City Council and its transport partners if they withdrew all the cycling and pedestrian improvement plans.

So, in the strange and isolated world where there is such a thing as Good News…

This was the view past the o2abc, where I recently mentioned the last section of road works was being completed.

Sauchiehall Avenue No Works

Sauchiehall Avenue No Works

It was quite interesting to travel along this.

And mildly hazardous – thanks to the cyclists stopping on it to take pics with their phones!

You will note I wasn’t standing on the path when I took my pics.

Maybe a few deranged people will be able to cycle along here, and NOT find reason to complain.

And, I wonder when the first fight/assault will be reported, as the cycle path seems to be a magnet for groups of pedestrians to walk along, beside the footpath, so I’m sure it won’t be long before some ‘ANGRY ACTIVIST CAMPAIGNING CYCLIST’ decides to ‘EDUCATE’ them, and clear ‘their’ path.

30/07/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography, Transport | , | Leave a comment

Looks like work is done on Sauchiehall Streets ‘Avenue’

It will be a few days until I’m back in Sauchiehall Street and I’ll finally get to see the completed ‘Avenue’.

When I was last there, I noted the final piece of work was being completed in front of the unfortunate o2abc venue, so it still wasn’t possible cycle along the entire length. It will be interesting.

Now…

If I was one of Glasgow’s miserable ‘Naysayers’ I’d already be joining that happy band and complaining about the new Avenue.

I’ve already seen local news feeds carrying pics of spots where there have been road works, and people have made complaints about the layout, about who has, and has not, got priority, and who is wandering on whose ‘space’.

Barely complete for just ONE DAY!

I’m surprised there isn’t a meeting of the angry old bike hating men of Glasgow being held there, in the middle of the cycle lane!

IN Pictures — The Sauchiehall Street ‘Avenue’

SAUCHIEHALL Street, between Charing Cross and Rose Street, has been turned into the first of Glasgow City Centre’s new people-friendly Avenues…

I hope ReGlasgow won’t grudge one little pic until I get there again.

Sauchiehall Street Avenue pic Credit ReGlasgow

Sauchiehall Street Avenue pic Credit ReGlasgow

I’m intrigued by the location of the camera.

25/07/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography, Transport | , | Leave a comment

Who’s this mystery photographer guy?

So. since it was a nice night, I decided to take a quick whizz up to Charing Cross, and see how the new ‘Avenues’ project and the cycle path on Sauchiehall Street were coming along.

It’s all quite close to completion now, after months of works, and the only really noticeable work is a fenced of hole in front of the unfortunate o2abc centre, which is the only part of the cycle path that can’t be ridden on.

But, before I got that far, I got a little surprise as headed  past the Savoy Centre – and a guy walking towards me suddenly grabbed a camera took a flash pic as I approached.

Now, there’s nothing wrong with that (unless he’s doing it for some ‘iffy’ reason, when he WOULD need consent) as it’s a public place, and I wasn’t doing anything even remotely wrong, cycling slowly in a pedestrian precinct. I try to avoid people, not point cameras directly at them in public.

But, unless he was using a VERY professional dSLR with an ISO up around 51200 (and this clearly wasn’t, as it was just a camera, maybe even just a phone camera, sitting on his chest), then at the distance the flash fired, it wasn’t really going to illuminate anything. I know, I’ve tried, and still suffer pain from trying not to laugh when tourists use flash to photograph the organ in Kelvingrove, from 20 metres or more,

As you can see, he has actually got a camera with a flash attached, hanging from his shoulder.

I was just taken a little by surprise, and do hope I don’t see myself portrayed as ‘Another damned cyclist riding on the pavement’ on some ant-cycling nut’s blog.

As I noted, cyclists are encouraged by the council to use pedestrian precincts, despite the use of ‘pedestrian’ in their name.

I really shouldn’t try these long shots in the dark, this was around 9:45 pm last night (and I didn’t want to get close, in case he really was a weirdo), so the shutter was never going stop the blur, even if the anti-shake did its job.

Mystery Photographer

Mystery Photographer

15/07/2019 Posted by | photography | , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S45

Interesting developments in the considerations regarding demolition of the remains of the building I had no idea had so many fans.

The o2abc, or former Regal Cinema in Sauchiehall Street was little more than an ‘innocent bystander’ to the event of the Mackintosh Building fire, but that didn’t mean it was immune, and suffered extensive fire damage itself.

It seems (from the reference article) that the demolition submission for the building didn’t include any attempts to retain any of the original structure, which seems like a bit of a mistake.

This omission has attracted attention…

SCOTLAND’S historic building watchdog has lodged a strongly-worded statement formally objected to plans to completely demolish the fire-ravaged O2 ABC music venue in Glasgow.

In their response, Historic Environment Scotland state: “We object to this application for complete demolition of the O2 ABC building because the case for doing so is not adequately justified against national policy. It is our view that the applicant has not made an adequate effort to retain and preserve this C-listed building (or any part of it), and has therefore not met the tests for demolition.

“The special architectural interest of the building lies largely in the street-facing elevation and entrance foyer. We would not object to a scheme that retained these parts of the building, either with proposals for immediate redevelopment or propped and secured in a way that facilitated redevelopment at a future date.

“Although the building is fire-damaged, the principal areas of architectural interest appear to remain intact and the applicant has not demonstrated that they cannot be preserved.

“A number of the concerns they raise are not supported by evidence. While a degree of uncertainty is understandable at this stage, we nevertheless consider that the applicants might reasonably have sought more clarity on many of these matters before submitting this application.”

Certainly, from the exterior, the surviving facade looks as if it could be retained, but as an engineer, I’m painfully aware that it could be attached to little more than ‘chewing gum and string’ behind, if the heat of the fire was sufficient to erode the structural integrity of the supporting structure behind.

Removal of, or even attempts to restore, that could lead to total failure.

Reading on, it looks as if there may now be some dispute and disagreement.

However, in a new submission to the council on behalf of the owners, RM Consulting state: “The complexity of the issue we presently face in dealing with the front façade is the overall extent of the cumulative fire and structural damage that the facade has suffered; whilst not obvious externally, any detailed inspection internally will reveal the totality of the damage.

“Faced with the significant amount of cumulative damage to the façade structure and coupled with the overall catastrophic damage that the building has suffered in general, our professional advisors are at a loss on how to retain or rely on the severely damaged façade as part of any future project.”

RM Consulting have asked the council for a detailed response as to how it thinks the facade can be safely retained.

HERITAGE Watchdog Opposed To Proposed Flattening Of Iconic Blaze-Hit Glasgow Venue

In the past, such remains have not been allowed to stand as long this after major fires.

Then (from my recollections at least), it was usual for the Fire Service to announce that its inspection of the building showed it was unsafe for anyone to enter, and that it had to be demolished on grounds of safety.

We lost some pretty big buildings in those days. Again, my recollection is of places like large churches that were used as nightclubs.

I’m not suggesting they were wrong – bear in mind these may have looked solid from the outside, but dated to a time when there was no steel framework, and wood was used for the interior. With a sufficiently fierce blaze, that could be burnt away, leaving an unsupported honeycomb behind.

That said, even steel supports soften and bend if it gets hot enough.

Scott Street O2abc Roof

Scott Street O2abc Roof

I walked past the o2abc a few times during this week, after the sun started to shine, and we got some VERY hot days.

The place absolutely REEKS!

Not the smell of a fire, of which there isn’t the slightest hint of smoke.

But of a really old building which has been taken over by wet/dry rot. mould, and maybe years and years of sweaty bodies dripping onto it (and maybe other ‘bodily fluids’ as well.

It’s fairly disgusting, and wasn’t present before, when it was cooler.

Go have a sniff 😉

14/07/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S44

I think it’s fair to say that some people think that recovery after the fire involves more than ‘bricks and mortar’.

This dates back to November (2018), but only seems to be getting a mention now.

See the absolutely wonderful comment by Glasgow Kelvin MSP Sandra White, at the end of the quote.

I have an excuse for not knowing about this until today.

What’s theirs?

A 28-year-old master’s degree student has set about one of Scotland’s toughest repair jobs.

Harriet Simms is working to rebuild trust between Glasgow School of Art and its fire-disrupted neighbours.

She says she has had to tread carefully but is already encouraged by the reaction of many people.

“It has been mainly positive but some people are still really angry, and that’s why I have been slow and considered and not gone in all guns blazing,” she told the i paper.

“I have been mindful to respect people and to say this is a long-term and considered role.”

One year on from the fire that devastated the world-renowned Mackintosh building for a second time, the area is still in upheaval.

An investigation is ongoing and many questions remain unanswered, foremost being what caused the fire.

Dozens of people who were forced out of their homes for several months are still suffering hardship and trauma.

Street protests held in the weeks following the events of June 15 targeted the Art School and city council for lack of communication and delays in getting people back into their homes.

Several businesses either moved or closed due to the chaos and loss of trade.

She is carrying out research into community participation and design alongside her role after completing a master’s degree at the Art School.

She said: “When I started there was a lot of anger, and a lot of valid anger, because of the trauma of last year.

“For a lot of people it was less about blame, it was more about ‘I want to get on with my life and get back to normal’.”

She has attended local council meetings and helped organise a community fete in the local park.

A multicultural centre has benefited from her input with new furniture, and was gifted student art works thanks to her involvement.

Local resident Uli Enslein said: “It now feels like someone cares – someone is interested in the local people who live here.”

Glasgow Kelvin MSP Sandra White said: “It may seem a bit late in the day for some people, but I see this appointment as a positive way forward.”

A GSoA spokeswoman said: “Harriet’s appointment is a long term commitment on our part and we look forward to working in partnership with the communities around the School on many future projects.”

How Glasgow School of Art is building bridges with ‘angry’ neighbours after fires

Mackintosh Building Scott Street

Mackintosh Building Scott Street

23/06/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S43

It’s the first anniversary of the big fire, and it seems it’s not been forgotten.

Although there’s little external evidence of ongoing activity at the remains of the Mackintosh Building (I know, I’ve been past it a few times, with little new to see), it seems that work is still being undertaken on a daily basis to make the structure safe, and parts are still being deconstructed.

Glasgow School of Art has re-affirmed its commitment to restoring the Mackintosh building, one year after it was ravaged by a tragic fire.

On the evening of Friday June 18, 2018, firefighters raced to the city centre blaze which had engulfed the Mack. When the fire was finally extinguished, a scene of devastation was left behind.

Ever since, Glaswegians have been left wondering whether we will ever see the Mack in its full glory again – the building was just months away from completion after being gutted during another major fire in 2014.

Yet Glasgow School of Art has this week confirmed to Glasgow Live the school’s intention to restore the building in honour of Charles Rennie Mackinstosh.

They said: “The Glasgow School of Art is committed to rebuilding the Mack as Mackintosh envisaged it. We will be bringing it back for our students, for the people of Glasgow and the wider world.

“This Friday will see 2019 Graduation which will be a day of celebration for our amazing students following a hugely successful Degree Show. Many will them will then be exhibiting work in London at the annual graduate showcases.

“We are focusing on this.”

However investigations into the fire continue, with Police Scotland and the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service both involved – it is still unclear what sparked the blaze, with the building then under the day-to-day control of Kier Construction.

When asked by Glasgow Live what stage their inquiries are at, an SFRS spokesperson commented: “The investigation is still ongoing”.

Glasgow School of Art committed to restoring Mackintosh building one year after fire

Investigators are entering the final phases of their probe into the fire which devastated Glasgow School of Art.

The world-renowned Mackintosh building was extensively damaged when a blaze broke out on 15 June last year.

A year on, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service said several hundred tonnes of debris still had to be removed from the remains of the building.

Neighbours of the art school told BBC Scotland they were eager to find out the results of the investigation.

Investigators have examined two sectors of the building following the removal of 400 tonnes of charred wreckage, according to the Scottish fire service.

They have also scoured hundreds of hours of CCTV footage and taken witness statements.

But before the final stages of the investigation can take place, more debris needs to be taken away from the “complex site”.

SFRS Assistant Chief Officer Ross Haggart said the fire service was working alongside on-site contractors to have the “significant volume” of remaining fire debris removed.

He added: “The fire investigation remains focused on likely origin and cause – but against the backdrop of an unprecedented large scale fire scene within a complex and challenging site.

“Our fire investigation team is working hard based on what remains within the building once the debris is removed, alongside all other evidence available to them.”

The probe is being led by fire service group manager David Dourley, who said the final phases of the investigation would be “challenging” due to the volume of debris.

“It is also a challenging site and we will require, at times, to work within confined spaces,” he said.

“But safety is paramount and each time we move to begin an excavation or go onto the site we will consult with Glasgow School of Art and also the on-site contractor.”

Earlier this year, the school of art was criticised by Holyrood’s culture committee, which found bosses did not give sufficient priority to safeguarding the building.

It has also faced criticism from some local residents and businesses who were unable to return to their properties for several months.

Ms Simpson said: “I want to know who is responsible for the fire because it is somebody’s fault. There is somebody, or a variety of bodies, that were to blame but you need to see the facts first before you start shouting ‘it was your fault’.

‘Final phases’ of Glasgow art school fire investigation

Probe into Glasgow Art School fire moves into final phases

And the ‘forgotten’…

To many Glaswegians, the major fire at the School of Art may seem like it was just yesterday, but for the residents of Garnethill this has been the longest year.

12 months ago, on Friday June 15, the area was devastated by a huge blaze which engulfed the heart of the community – the world renowned Mackintosh building.

Not only did the residents have to suffer the sight of ‘a fireball falling from the heavens’ on their very own doorsteps, some were unable to access their homes for three months in the fall-out from the fire.

Yet there is finally hope for those living in Garnethill and optimism for the future. During a deeply traumatic time, community spirit has never been stronger.

In the week in which Glasgow Live reported the School of Art’s unequivocal commitment to have the Mack reconstructed “as Mackintosh envisaged it”, we had the opportunity to speak to chair of Garnethill Community Council, Jane Sutherland, about the experiences of the area’s residents over the last year.

Recalling the night of June 18, Jane said: “It was very frightening – it was a very scary night.

“We were all out on the streets, watching a fireball fall from the heavens. It really was terrifying.

“The firefighters looked like they had water pistols on it. It was an absolute inferno. I think they expressed on the night that some of them had never seen anything like it. I believe it was visible as far afield as Motherwell. It really was like a volcano.”

While the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service and Police Scotland’s investigations into the blaze continue, the scars of that evening are still understandably apparent, yet there’s a sense from Jane things are starting to move in the right direction.

She explained: “I think there is a traumatised community.

“As you can imagine, it’s been an exceptionally challenging time, for all of the residents in Garnethill and for all the people who work here as well, because access to Garnethill is very restricted and that’s the ongoing day-to-day problems.

“It’s also been difficult with access because of the Sauchiehall Street Avenues project – slowly that’s all opening up and that will see a boost and an improvement to the fabric of the neighbourhood – bring a bit of cheer to faces.

“It’s been really hard-going with all of that building work and all of the building work going on at the Mack and the Reid Building. Renfrew Street is still closed, and looks like it might be for sometime yet, which restricts access.

“The thing is not just to dwell on the challenges of it, how hard it’s been – it has been shockingly hard – it’s the efforts the community and the Art School, all kinds of groups, have been working very, very hard since the fire to improve the community relations and see what good we can bring out of this.”

And in spite of initial difficulties, the relationship between the School of Art and local residents has now strengthened, while the city has given its backing to local community projects helping to renew Garnethill’s sense of purpose.

Jane added: “Since November, I think the Art School have recognised their communications with the community wasn’t as good as it should have been. I think they’ve made sterling efforts to really integrate into the community here, and offer opportunities for practical help and assistance.

Glasgow Art School fire – traumatised Garnethill residents reflect on ‘shockingly hard’ year

I’ll just leave these here…

Remembering the Glasgow Art School fire – one year on from devastating blaze

02 ABC one year on from Glasgow Art School blaze – here’s what’s happening

 

Mackintosh Building Renfrew Street

Mackintosh Building Renfrew Street

 

16/06/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S42

Not related to the building, but still of interest.

Glasgow School of Art chairwoman Muriel Gray has temporarily stepped down from her role almost a year after fire engulfed the Mackintosh building.

The renowned art school was extensively damaged last June while it was undergoing a £35m restoration following a previous fire in May 2014.

Ms Gray, whose husband has cancer, said she was stepping down from her role “for personal family reasons”.

Vice-chairwoman Professor Nora Kearney will take over as interim chairwoman.

Ms Gray said: “I have advised the board of governors of the Glasgow School of Art that I will be taking a temporary period of absence both as chair of the board and as a lay governor for personal family reasons.

“Given the challenges the school has faced over the past 12 months this was an incredibly difficult decision to take.”

Muriel Gray steps down from Glasgow School of Art post

Near identical coverage from STV:

Muriel Gray temporarily steps down from art school role

While the BRAVE MORONS COMMMENTERS who skulk after articles in The Scotsman never disappoint with their predictable responses:

Muriel Gray temporarily steps down as Glasgow School of Art chief

I’m almost surprised none suggested the board of the GSA was responsible for this most recent Glasgow blaze.

Firefighters tackle huge blaze at university building

Glasgow School of Art post fire

09/06/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sorry for mentioning cycling again

I feel I have to apologise for some fairly frequent mentions of cycling, which I almost don’t even want to do for fear of sounding like a fan, or worse, a damned activist!

But there just seems to be a lot happening all of a sudden, and this year seems to be very busy already.

Maybe it’s just our ‘heatwaves’ bringing more people out of doors.

My usual routes are already busier than last year – I think I’ve already passed more other cyclists this year than I did last year.

Also notable is the number of Nextbikes (the hired ones), which I hardly saw in use last year, this year already seem to be all over the place.

But what I really wanted to mention was the response to the impending completion of reorganising Sauchiehall Street, to encourage pedestrians and cyclists, and discourage motor vehicles.

For the past couple of years, there was a disappointing level of negativity and adverse comment about the proposals and the work, with some suggesting it wouldn’t work for various reasons, and that it would be the death of many shops in Sauchiehall Street as people deserted it because of the changes.

Seems the naysayers (dare I say “As usual”) were wrong, and it seems that actual traders there are relatively happy.

A number of Glasgow businesses have spoken out about the ongoing Sauchiehall Street Avenues project, praising the impact it has had.

The £115 million Avenues programme, piloted in Sauchiehall Street, will upgrade at least 17 key streets across the city centre over the next six years until 2025.

Work in this area, which extends pavements and cycle lanes and reduces space for vehicles, is expected to be completed by the end of May.

Now, some of Sauchiehall Street’s main business people have praised the project, claiming it will transform the area.

Brian Fulton, co-director and co-owner of the Garage nightclub and chair of the Sauchiehall Street Avenue Project, said: “I think it’s really going to make a big difference to how we use the street going forward.

“Back before the bid started people were really negative about the streetscape in the public realm so we spoke to businesses about what they would want from a street and public realm improvements was the main, overriding thing.

“With the set up of the bid, it put us in a good position to lobby to have this as the first pilot project of the Avenues project and you can see here today the difference it’s made to the streetscape compared to how it was four, five years ago.”

The scheme, which will introduce green infrastructure, extend pedestrian walkways and reduce space for vehicles, have been separated into three blocks – A, B and C.

Block A includes the Sauchiehall Street development but will also oversee the transformation of Argyle Street, Dixson Street and St Enoch’s Centre into a pedestrian and cycle friendly city.

The Underline, which will connect the West End to the city centre via St George’s Place, Phoenix Road and New City Road, will promote similar routes.

Businesses speak out on Sauchiehall Street’s ongoing Avenues project

Why wouldn’t anyone want what this is delivering?

Sauchiehall Street was an ancient mish-mash of outdated layouts and systems until this came along – I didn’t even bother walking along there just for a look. Seeing traffic trying to use the old layout made me glad I wasn’t trying to drive there.

More

The current changes seem set to become still further enhances, with almost £300 k set to be released for more improvements.

Glasgow councillors are expected to support a plan to pump almost £300,000 into footpath improvements on one of the city’s main streets.

City chiefs can approve the use of the money on Sauchiehall Street , as part of the ongoing Avenues programme, when they meet on Thursday.

It has been generated from developer contributions, where private companies behind city centre projects commit funds to public realm schemes.

The £290,000 of funding, from a private development at Buchanan Street/Bath Street, will go towards footway works on the northern side of Sauchiehall Street, between Charing Cross and Rose Street.

Councillors set to back £300,000 plan for Sauchiehall Street footpaths

I was there last week, just for a look, and there’s still quite a bit of work to be completed, but most of the changes have been made and it’s possible to see what the finished street will look like.

My only gripe remains the same – that black tarmac laid for the cycle path is terrible.

The contractor should be sent back in to smooth it off, at THEIR cost.

The surface ripples make it shooglier than the block paving around it!

Sauchiehall Street Avenue

Sauchiehall Street Avenue

19/05/2019 Posted by | photography, Transport | , , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S41

Other than the straight reporting occasionally seen in the media, this must be one of the few sensible articles I’ve seen arising from the fires in Glasgow.

There’s no point in dwelling on my point, as I consider the concept to be too well drilled into too many Scottish minds, but the near obsessive to find someone to BLAME before doing anything else is simply not helpful or productive – but I’m sure must bring a nice warm glow to the hearts of those who always want someone’s head to roll. Especially if they get one, or more.

Meanwhile, the grown-up try to do something useful.

Professor Guillermo Rein believes emergency services across the globe should be sending officials to Scotland to learn from the experience of the two Glasgow School of Art fires.

Fire crews who battled two major fires at Glasgow School of Art have the knowledge to prevent blazes such as the Notre-Dame disaster happening again, an expert has claimed.

Imperial College London Professor Guillermo Rein believes emergency services across the globe should be sending officials to Scotland to learn from the experience of the two Glasgow School of Art fires.

The fire science expert told the Sunday Mail blazes in heritage buildings are rare, occurring perhaps once or twice in a firefighter’s career.

But he insisted full “knowledge sharing” should take place when they do happen – and said the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service (SFRS) is a world leader in this area of expertise.

Rein said: “There’s a lot to be learned from the School of Art fires. I hold the Scottish firefighters in very high esteem.

“For any city in the world that has a cathedral or significant heritage building, I would be sending a delegation to Glasgow.

“What they saw and experienced is very valuable. We cannot afford to have many more of these types of fires.

“We know now that those involved in the work which was being carried out at Notre-Dame were surprised that the fire burned so fast.

“But they designed the fire protection in isolation from the rest of the world – they did the opposite of learning from others.

“It turns out their fire protection design was flawed. It shows why it is important to learn from experiences of others and to share knowledge.

“It highlights that the rest of the world needs to know and learn from what the Scottish fire services experienced.”

Rein said that it’s a “concern” how the Glasgow School of Art burned not once, but twice – though it was not the fire service that failed.

Rein added: “They did the best they could – but it means the rest of the world can now learn from them. They will have become world leaders in dealing with fires like this.

“If I was the mayor of Paris, I would be sending officials to Scotland to learn from what they experienced fighting the School of Art fires.”

Rein said firefighters “need to be aggressive with the fire but gentle with the building when fighting such fires”.

He added: “This is when I really admire the firefighters – they manage to protect
the structure while attacking the fire.”

Glasgow Art School firefighters ‘have knowledge to prevent future blazes’ after Notre Dame

Mackintosh Scott Street from Pitt Street

Mackintosh Scott Street from Pitt Street

12/05/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mackintosh Building S40

Back in Mackintosh Building S37 I tried to catch the remaining features of the o2abc, a place I’d never even noticed, and was amazed to find was popular. So, I obviously have no life (in the eyes of some).

At the time, street access was still limited and I couldn’t get near enough for a façade pic taken looking west.

The street is gradually clearing, and I was able to add the missing view to the collection.

Click for bigger.

Sauchiehall Street O2 Looking West

Sauchiehall Street O2 Looking West

Notre Dame

I still find it interesting to compare the miserable reaction of some Scots and Glaswegians immediately after the Mackintosh fire, and the open hostility to the building, its potential restoration, and the raising of funds, with the haters not wanting to see a penny of any public money spent on it, and others calling for the remains to be razed to make space for something ‘useful’ instead.

Rather different from the response on the Continent after the fire damage to Notre Dame, where they seem to have been showered with so much money for rebuilding that they might have TOO MUCH!

Of course, the people who are happiest when they are miserable are pitching in as well, arguing the money should go elsewhere (maybe they are Glaswegians, spreading their ‘joy’ around the world)

Since the fire that tore through Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris last week, donations have been pouring in from across the world to restore the structure to its former glory.

Ordinary people and billionaires have pledged at least €750m (£650m; $835m) in the 10 days after the main spire and roof of the building collapsed in a huge fire on 15 April.

One early estimate by French construction economists suggests that the donations may far surpass the cost of repairs.

Amid the wave of goodwill and generosity, critics have argued that the money could have been better spent elsewhere.

But those collecting money for the repairs are urging people to keep donating, saying a price cannot yet be put on the work.

“We should not tell people to stop donating as we still don’t know how much it is going to cost,” said Laurence Lévy of French heritage group Fondation du Patrimoine.

Notre-Dame fire: Has too much money been given to rebuild it?

Man with big money bag

28/04/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: