Secret Scotland

If it's secret, and in Scotland…

Next giant mural WILL be seen in the east end

I’m sometime taken by surprise when something happens quickly, and this didn’t tale long at all.

No indication of when it will appear though, so I might have to try to remember to make detours.

Really, I will.

The cycle route through this area avoids this busy junction as takes a detour well away from it, so I don’t normally see this spot.

Plans for a new piece of art on a Glasgow east end building have been given the go ahead by councillors.

Members of Glasgow City Council’s planning committee agreed to back proposals for a new piece of art on a building at 499 London Road, paying tribute to St Mungo’s mum.

The plans were put forward by Thenue Housing Association to mark their 40th anniversary, and asked art collective ArtPistol to prepare the designs.

Glasgow mural trail: New artwork paying tribute to St Mungo’s mum in east end given green light by council

Previously

Thenue Housing Association has commissioned the work, in London Road, near Bridgeton Cross, to mark its 40th anniversary in October 2019.

The association manages a number of buildings in the area, and is seeking permission for the mural to be created on a prominent gable at 499 London Road, near Bridgeton., and is near their head office.

The mural would depict the moment Princess Theneva was rescued from the River Forth by St Serf of Culross Abbey, while she was pregnant with the future St Mungo (Glasgow’s patron saint and founder), after being cast out by her father.

In a statement submitted with the application, Ali Smith of ArtPistol explains: “It is this brief moment of fate, which is to become part of the origin story of Glasgow, that we want to capture in the mural.

“This is not going to be a religious mural, with religious imagery. We are avoiding that and looking to visualise the moment in a contemporary way. It is all about that moment Serf meets Thenue [Theneva], the sheer significance of it, the fortuitous and beautiful timing, and creating a stunning piece of street art.”

GLASGOW’S Latest Mural To Be Inspired By Rescue Of Patron Saint’s Mother

In more detail…

The new street art will feature Princess Theneva or Saint Enoch (Thenue), who lived from 510 to about 570.

She was the daughter of King Loth of the Gododdin, and mother of St Mungo or St Kentigern – the patron saint and founder of Glasgow.

The work will capture the moment Theneva was rescued by Saint Serf of Culross Abbey in Fife after her dad had thrown her into the River Forth.

Glasgow mural trail: new artwork in tribute to St Mungo’s mum planned for east end

This would add to the existing murals on this theme in High Street and George Street.

So, here’s the ‘before’ shot.

499 London Road at Abercromby Street

499 London Road at Abercromby Street

 

21/06/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography | , , , | Leave a comment

Next giant mural could be seen in the east end

Thenue Housing Association has commissioned the work, in London Road, near Bridgeton Cross, to mark its 40th anniversary in October 2019.

The association manages a number of buildings in the area, and is seeking permission for the mural to be created on a prominent gable at 499 London Road, near Bridgeton., and is near their head office.

The mural would depict the moment Princess Theneva was rescued from the River Forth by St Serf of Culross Abbey, while she was pregnant with the future St Mungo (Glasgow’s patron saint and founder), after being cast out by her father.

In a statement submitted with the application, Ali Smith of ArtPistol explains: “It is this brief moment of fate, which is to become part of the origin story of Glasgow, that we want to capture in the mural.

“This is not going to be a religious mural, with religious imagery. We are avoiding that and looking to visualise the moment in a contemporary way. It is all about that moment Serf meets Thenue [Theneva], the sheer significance of it, the fortuitous and beautiful timing, and creating a stunning piece of street art.”

GLASGOW’S Latest Mural To Be Inspired By Rescue Of Patron Saint’s Mother

In more detail…

The new street art will feature Princess Theneva or Saint Enoch (Thenue), who lived from 510 to about 570.

She was the daughter of King Loth of the Gododdin, and mother of St Mungo or St Kentigern – the patron saint and founder of Glasgow.

The work will capture the moment Theneva was rescued by Saint Serf of Culross Abbey in Fife after her dad had thrown her into the River Forth.

Glasgow mural trail: new artwork in tribute to St Mungo’s mum planned for east end

This would add to the existing murals on this theme in High Street and George Street.

So, here’s the ‘before’ shot.

499 London Road at Abercromby Street

499 London Road at Abercromby Street

 

17/05/2019 Posted by | Civilian, council, photography | , , , | 2 Comments

Kelvingrove’s neglected view

Look for images of Kelvingrove and the chances are you will mainly get views of the side facing Dumbarton Road.

Just look at the header image on the museum’s web site

Despite legends about the building being built back to front, leading the architect to throw himself to his death from one of the towers), the simple fact is that the building was always intended to face into Kelvingrove Park. However, it is true to say that most visitors arrive at the Dumbarton Road entrance and assume that to be the front. I noted this recently as a group of tourists asked how they’d know they were at Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, and when to get off the bus – of course they were told they couldn’t miss the front of the building (not by me, but some other heading for the same place).

That said, I’ve been visiting the place for all of my life, should know better, but still mentally assign ‘back’ and ‘front’ to the wrong faces!

I though of this a few weeks ago, while standing at the top of the hill overlooking Kelvingrove from Glasgow University, and had wondered if the seasonal absence of any foliage on the trees would allow Kelvingrove to be seen. Sadly, no. There’s just too many trees in the way, and all you can see is the roof, even from that vantage point.

I’d looked at the view from the car park (on the Kelvingrove Park side) before, and knew it was restricted. There a few large trees fairly close to the building, and the proximity of the River Kelvin means you can’t stand as far back as on the Dumbarton Road side, so need a VERY wide lens to capture the whole façade.

Or some clever imaging software, which I decided to give a try, on the basis that ANY images is better than NO image.

The version I use (for free, of course) combines images radially rather than linearly, but after a couple of tries I was able to stand far enough back and avoid most of the (foliage free at the moment) trees, and get an image that just looks the usual perspective distorted result of a very wide-angle lens.

It’s worth noting that you’ll never get a clear view thanks to those trees, so you HAVE to try this sort of shot during the winter months when the trees have lost their leaves.

Kelvingrove Kelvin Stitch

Kelvingrove Kelvin Stitch

I found the main limiting factor was the height of the building as I didn’t want to start stitching vertical images as well as horizontal, and managed this with only two shots, making it easier for the image combination.

For comparison, this is the straight view using a 27 mm (35 mm) lens, which is 18 mm in ‘modern money’ digital camera terms.

Kelvingrove River Kelvin view

Kelvingrove River Kelvin view

Time to get a little closer, and look at the ‘new’ entrance we got thanks to the £30 million ‘restoration’ of 2003-2006, which provided ground level disabled access with lifts, and also allowed some 8,000 artefacts to go on permanent display, as opposed to only 4,000 in the previous layout (still leaving thousands in storage).

The ‘new’ layout discarded partitions that restricted much of the space, and where the lower floor was the museum, and the upper the art gallery – but figures showed that few than one-third of visitors ever ventured upstairs! Today, the space is mixed throughout.

Described as the ‘Main Entrance’, this view show the statue of St Mungo, patron Saint of Glasgow, above the lower ground floor entrance.

Kelvingrove St Mungo Entrance

Kelvingrove St Mungo Entrance

To explain that, the lower ground floor was dug out of the old basement (during the redevelopment mentioned above), leaving the existing ground floor and first floor above, as they always were.

So, nothing confusing at Kelvingrove then: the front is the back, and the ground floor is the lower ground floor (which was the basement), the first floor is the ground floor, and the second floor is the first floor – all depending on which entrance you use 🙂

I should the leave the last word to St Mungo, I think often neglected, so here is his close up.

Kelvingrove St Mungo

Kelvingrove St Mungo

The figures to his left and right represent art, and music.

I may have to go back for more, having noticed the various reliefs that adorn the arches here, by the same artist who created this bronze, George Frampton, and similarly (in my opinion) generally neglected, not noticed, and seldom mentioned. The same could probably said of other figures around the exterior of the building – I may be there for a while one day, and have to do some digging into my original souvenir guide-book, from before the redevelopment.

 

30/03/2019 Posted by | photography | , , | Leave a comment

St Enoch, St Mungo, and a robin

Continuing my current frustrating run of ‘wrong time, wrong place’ events, I was less than pleased to find I’d chosen a route that had me heading down High Street, one corner away from catching Glasgow’s newest mural just as it was being completed, which would have been the perfect match for its partner, on the other end of the same tenement block, which I did come across just before it was completed.

By the time I could get back to George Street, this one was completed.

St Enoch St Mungo Robin Mural George Street

St Enoch St Mungo Robin Mural George Street

Don’t know about that forearm though. Compare it to the wrist. Maybe a scaling slip?

The new mural’s older partner, at the other end of the block.

High Street Mural

High Street Mural

Pulling back a bit, to show the nearby High Street junction, reveals this to lie just across from one of my favourite buildings, the old Holroyd Art Gallery, which is set to be no longer as this corner is redeveloped as new student accommodation.

There’s nothing notable about this old survivor other than it is simply that, a survivor that has always been there, even it was closed and most of the building was abandoned. It’s a bit like the ‘comfy old shoes’ effect – they’re not great, but you like them.

Click for a little bigger.

St Enoch St Mungo George Street Mural

St Enoch St Mungo George Street Mural

28/08/2018 Posted by | Civilian, photography | , , , , | Leave a comment

Maybe just ONE more – the High Street mural

So, I lied, and here’s another High Street item (also (yet) another post inspired by the proposals to brighten the area up).

This is actually an old pic I never got around to using, and was taken on a pretty grim day when this work was probably not long completed, hence the fencing at the base.

Actually, I’ve realised I caught it before it was finished, as a closer look reveals the hand on which the robin is perched lacks any of the detail seen in the rest of the work. Later sightings confirm this.

Also an evening shot, pushing the available light (cropped out of the shot, but the street lights were on, and I forgot about this pic as I hadn’t expected it to come out half as well as it did), the mural is really much brighter and more colourful than this view makes it appear.

If the image seems somehow familiar, then you’re right, bearing in mind Glasgow Cathedral is nearby.

This is said to be a modern day version of the story of St Mungo and Glasgow’s coat of arms:

The Bird — Mungo restored life to a robin, which had been tamed by St Serf, but had been killed by some of his classmates, jealous of Mungo as he was favoured by St Serf.

High Street Mural

High Street Mural

07/04/2018 Posted by | photography | , , , | 1 Comment

   

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